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The Windy City

Many people think that Chicago got its name due to the weather, but that is not right. Chicago, “The Windy City” was initially used by the Cincinnati Press and then later used by Chicago Tribune in 1876. I was raised in Chicago, and the history is never ending.

Written by Maty Patino

Photo by Maty Patino

History is so pleasing, but even more when it has to do with place or person you truly care about, in this case Chicago. There is so many amazing people who come from the city of Chicago. This city is full of art and artists. Any way you turn, there is art. Art in murals, art hanging, art as a building.

Photo by Maty Patino

People themselves are because everyone is so different and unique. Everyone has such a different style that it makes each and one of us a piece of art created by the biology of the universe. Each individual provides the world with something. Whether it is the art itself such as buildings, paintings, drawings, landscaping, or even love in which you just feel.

Photo by Maty Patino

Thinking about Chicago can make some of us feel melancholy. But, looking for something related to our city can always make us feel better. As I walked through the Krannert Art Museum, I realized how much of the history I did not know. Moreover, I started to reminisce my days in Chicago and how much I missed it. I started to think about my way to downtown, and how the city itself is art, whether it’s the graffiti, the huge Moose Bubblegum Bubble by Jacob Watts or the Willis Tower.

Thank you to the Krannert Art Museum for filling our hearts with joy as we see the art that they hold by our beloved city artists.

Photo by Maty Patino

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Describing A City With Art

A collection of diverse pieces of art representing Chicago at the Krannert Art Museum

Written by Bill Xun

Taken by Bill Xun

Between The Buildings: Art From Chicago, 1930s to 1980s is currently on display at the Krannert Art Museum. It’s amazing to see each artist’s individual perspectives and how they choose to represent the city that they live in. Some choose to use photos; others use sculptures, paintings, and all sorts of abstract art. Collectively, the entire exhibition gives viewers a summary of Chicago as a whole through a collection of pieces.

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The Rush, the Changes and the Innerself

Before going to Krannert Art Museum, I was expecting an exhibition that related more to architechture since the name was “between the buildings” (and apparently I omitted the word “between”). Disappointed to find that we have been there and seen some of the paintings, I then spent more than an hour at the gallery. I was utterly amazed by the thoughtfulness and introspection each piece of art brings.

I LOVE how much thought was put in this piece. The obsession with hair and pretty faces in media has a significant influence on our perception of beauty, and by showing only the back side of hair ironically, the creator demonstrated how hair is displayed as attractive in the media. The sarcasm in this artwork is awesome.

 

 

This sketch piece looks simple, but it is my favorite one at the gallery. Although it is not the most eye-catching artwork, it has THE perfect angle and composition and I felt its beauty. The shade was painted with a cursive manner, but it displays the contrast between light and shadow perfectly.

 

 

Here are two more pictures I took at the gallery. I’d like to explain more if I have time to, but in general I loved how “Eschikago” showed us the history of the First Nations, and the last piece demonstrated our inner fears and outer challenges in life.

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Representing life in Chicago with Art

Written by Syed Ali

This week, the Krannert Art Museum held an exhibition, “Between the Buildings: Art from Chicago, 1930s – 1980s,”  that held various paintings and art sculptures representing Chicago/life in Chicago. Various artists created differing themes about what aspects of Chicago are most important and how they can be represented. Continue reading

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In a sunny peaceful afternoon, I went into the krannert museum,starting a new exploration.

Written by Linjie Yang

Since  I only have been to Chicago downtown only one time, I do not know much about this city. I just want to command some of these paintings.

The first painting  left me a strong impression is this “three women”. This painting wants to illustrate the women in different colors own the same right and should be treated equally.What’s more, this painting was finished in the late 19’s. At that time, only a few people had the awareness of advocating women’s rights. From this particular detail, I think Chicago is an elightning city.

        

The second piece is this giant painting. During my first glance, I was shocked. Because the style of the painting is very Japanese.  Due to there is no annotation along sides this painting, I can not find further information on this piece. I am conjecturing if there is a special relationship between Chicago and Japanese.


 The last one is this pretty metal style piece. The only item I could recognize in the painting is a robot. I spent much time in front of this painting, and I like the color of it. I don't know why but I just felt this painting looks very 'Chicago.' Maybe this painting leaves me the same impression as Chicago did.                

 

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Expression of Chicago

Written By Tim Gao

Photo By Tim Gao

Highlighting the artworks from Chicago-based artists, the exhibition, Between the buildings, unfolds the stories and spirits buried in history. The historical background of Between the buildings is interesting. In last century Chicago, many artists working in isolation, producing creativity, diversity, and personal aesthetics. However, the artists could hardly find opportunities to exhibit their works. Thus they collectively exhibit with students in art schools, forming the idea of Chicago School.

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Different Perspectives, One Goal

Living in a community where there are so many people unlike yourself can be hard. However, having the same drive to be great and see beauty in the world around you is what brings the people of Chicago together.

By: Deja Cook- Reynolds

After attending the Krannert Art Museum’s Chicago exhibit, I was quite confused on what I was looking at. All the art was so different, but in a way; they had to be similar, right? Although, in order to understand the art around me, I had to dig deep and find out what Chicago meant to me. Was it just a place where people lived, or was it more than that? But people can live anywhere I said to myself, so what made Chicago “so special”. It was the fact that Chicago is composed of so many different type of people. People that work together to build a community that is special to them, without losing the core of Chicago’s traditions, the music, food, and community where people can let go, be themselves, and have fun!

So when, I was looking at the art work; I saw the fun and the beauty of Chicago. I saw the picture of the different communities painted in the images. They all captured different things, but indeed the theme was the same, the beauty of life Chicago, striving to live in the moment and not to be afraid of the journey or the people you might meet while you are there.

By: Philip Hanson

By: Art Sinsabaugh

By: Nathan Lerner

By: Ted Halkin

Chicago Exhibit

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The Charming City of Chicago

Written by Emily Reeter

I think the artists tried to represent the passion, hustle, and chaos of the city with their illustrations of masses of people and vibrant colors. In one of the paintings they showcased all of the city’s people walking in a crowded downtown area.  It was unique because each and every person was dressed in something unique and bold.  I liked that painting the most because it really represented all the different cultures emerging in the city.  One of the reasons I like cities like Chicago so much is because of the diversity they bring and the different cultural influences they have throughout the city.   I thought this painting did a good job of showing the diversity with the different apparel choices and through the different directions everyone is headed.  Other paintings focused on the skyscrapers and exhibited the beautiful architecture of the Windy City.  I loved how modern and state-of-the-art, yet realistic all of the buildings looked.  I think the combination of the skyscrapers and hustling people paint a good picture of the hustling life of the city.  It’s a beautiful city with endless opportunities, but filled with an array of people from all different backgrounds that are all restless and ambitious to make something out of the assets supplied to them in this magical place. I drew my own illustration of my vision of the sun rising over the city, but the residents are already up moving.  They are on their way to make their impact and mark on this city before the sun has even risen over these skyscrapers.  It’s a city of art, ambition, and an array of residents with different backgrounds.

 

 

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The Colors of Chicago

Written by Andrew Duran,

Image by Andrew Duran

Being raised in the city of Chicago, you begin to pick up on the colors that the city begins to depict. The sound of late night trains screeching to a stop and the feeling of a current bouncing in between two large buildings is unique to the city.

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Solo Guitarist: Marcus Tardelli

The performance on last Wednesday was an amazing experience for me. Most of the performances I have been to are orchestras or musicals that have more of a complex composition than the solo guitar performance. Honestly, seeing only one performer on stage was uncommon for me and monotonous at first, but then it was enjoyable to see how engaged he was in his guitar and his music.

What seperates the live performance and listening to music at home was the experience. Seeing the musician basking in the pure joy of the music, observing how he plays the instrument and feeling the ambience inside Follienger’s Great Hall makes the whole experience unique. Also, what I noticed from the music pieces Marcus Tardelli played was that none of those are catchy. Compared to pop music that catch your ear in the first five seconds, the ones he played were more classic.

Although I have zero knowledge about the guitar, I could tell that he had perfect control of the guitar and is a true master. However, I did wish that I knew more about the guitar so that I would fully appreciate his talent and efforts. If it was a pianist’s performance, I would be way more enthralled than this performance. One fun thing was that, after the performance and on our way out, an old lady told me she was wondering how classic guitars and electric guitars differ. I said I had no idea, but I liked her thought. In general, it was still a fun night at the KCPA.

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Peaceful but powerful

Written by Xuan Huynh

On Wednesday night, I got the opportunity to witness an amazing guitarist, Marcus Tardelli, perform classical and Brazilian songs at the Krannert Center. Marcus was the only person on stage, but the passion he displayed while playing his guitar made the performance dramatic but still very relaxing. The music I typically listen to make me feel important because it’s relatable and it contains lyrics that focus on the audience. I felt the complete opposite way at Marcus’s performance. He did not once acknowledge the audience while playing the guitar. His emotions and body movement were moving with his strings as one, and it was enjoyable to watch because I was witnessing a connection between him and his love. With that being said, this experience of listening to music made me pay more attention to him as an artist instead of my own personal desires.

Furthermore, while I was watching and listening to him play on the empty stage, I couldn’t help but visualize a dance performance or scene that would compliment his sound. The setting and his performance encourage me to use my imagination a lot more than I usually do while listening to music because there weren’t any distractions. Most of the time, the lyrics of a song make me think about a certain event or anything that relates to the music so that distracts me from thinking about ideas that can praise the sound. Also, sometimes when I’m listening to music is when I’m doing a silent activiBecauseuase of that, most of my attention is on the other task so I don’t have the time to create ideas from the melody.

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How Tardelli changed the way I feel about live performed music.

Written by Thomas Kirkendall

Marcus Tardelli gives an amazing guitar performance  at the wonderful Krannert center on October 3rd 2018.  Every couple years the Krannert center has an event known as Ellnora this guitar festival lasts three days and brings great musicians around the world to the Krannert center.

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Marcus Tardelli: Master Guitarist

Marcus Tardelli performs a masterful solo performance at the Krannert Center.

Written by: Bill Xun

Photo by Bill Xun

On Wednesday night, Marcus Tardelli performed a solo set consisting of arrangements of classical pieces and traditional Brazilian pieces. It was easy to see the passion that he plays with from the beginning of the first piece. From slow melodic pieces to fast skillful pieces, it was never a dull moment at the performance.

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Amazing experience

Last night, at the Krannert Center for Performing Arts, the famous guitarist Marcus Tardelli held a solo performance. The moment I entered the hall, I realize that this is the place that we visited two weeks ago, with the ghost light, but right now it’s full of people.

 

Between the third and the fourth piece, I especially noticed the way he plays that guitar, I feel like although he talks to the audience from time to time, he wasn’t playing for us, he wasn’t playing for anyone else in that Hall except for himself, the way he focused on every single note, the way he enjoyed the music came from the string and the wood. He was just like falling in his music. I think back to myself while I was practicing piano at home, I wasn’t as enjoying the music came from my hand through the wood as he does. While playing a sad part he was frowning, while playing a cheerful part he was shaking his head with the music and smiling.

During the concert, there were people coughs, and making noises that were very loud, it was so quiet that you can almost hear every sound that didn’t come from the guitar. I was first annoyed by all the noise that made by the audience, but later I thought to myself, the noise and music are all sound, why do we typically enjoying the music so much but not the noise? Then I realized that it’s not the difference in sound that makes us feel pleasure or annoying, it’s how we perceived it that makes the difference. Since they are all just different sounds, why don’t I just enjoy this randomness?

Being physically in a concert listening to music is a lot different than listening to the music at home, when we listen to the music at home we choose what we want to listen, whereas in a concert we listen to what the performer presents to us. Sometimes at home when I listen to a song and if I don’t like it I might just cut it or change the song within the first ten seconds, but in a concert, I don’t have such a power, I was forced to finish every single piece whether or not I like it. But the amazing part is that for every piece, even I don’t like it at the beginning, as I kept listening, I find my own enjoyment. For a sad song, I imagine someone just breaks up with his loved one, in the fifth piece I see children playing around the beach, full of smiles and sunshine. I almost remembered all the feelings that I have toward different pieces, which is an amazing experience.

In the end, all of the audience seems really enjoying his performance, and he exits the stage in thunderous applause.

Wait that’s not the end yet, he actually came back and gave us another joyful and fast piece before he exits the stage again in thunderous applause.

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The Barriers Between Us: Kennedy Browne, The Special Relationship

Written by Alyssa Pappas

Photo by A.Pappas

There are many things and contributing factors in which make everyone their own individual. Some of these differing factors can act as barriers connecting us.

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Live Music: How music can move you

Written by Syed Ali

Marcus Tardelli, a Brazilian guitarist, held a reverb concert at the Krannert Center for Performing Arts on Wednesday, this week. His music and skill with the guitar moved the audience as he wove through several Brazilian songs/solos, creating different melodies and themes with every piece. 
Tardelli’s music and live performance was engaging and personal. When I listen to music at home, I usually pair it with actions such as doing homework or completing chores. Sometimes, but not all the time, I listen to music for the sake of just listening; I’ve rarely close-appreciated music before. The performance, however, required much more attention and focus than just listening to music at home.The large audience created a sense of pressure and the musician created varying levels of music that truly moved me.

 

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Marcus Tardelli: The Passion of Guitar

Written by Tim Gao

Photo by Tim Gao

Last night, at Krannert Center for Performing Art, there was a guitar concert performed by a Brazilian genius, called Marcus Tardelli. When he was still a child, his talents of guitar started to show up. Marcus Tardelli likes to listen and memorize all of the notes about the song. After that, he will replay the song he heard and even ask his teacher for more songs. Because of Tardelli’s extraordinary ability in guitar, he started to give concerts in this hometown. Since then, Tardelli started to listen to more genres of music, such as symphony orchestras, jazz, European classical, and Brazilian music. He perfectly combines the music with other genres of music from the world, to give the audience an idea that how amazing guitar could be. The show in the Foellinger Great Hall was a rare opportunity to witness all of these.

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Marcus Tardelli: The Energy of Music

Written by: Nora Guerrero

Watching and listening to Marcus Tardelli from the center of the auditorium, my attention was completely captivated by his intricate playing of the guitar. When one listens to music at home, the multiple instruments in a song can get lost. Viewing Tardelli live however, there was only one instrument in focus.

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A Wonderful Evening

I went to the Marcus Tardellis concert this eveing which provided me a brand new experience.

written by LinJie Yang

It is my first time attending a guitar concert this evening and I find so much difference between listening record at home and at listening in the concert hall.   

To begin with, let me talk about several pieces that I really like during the performance. One is the first piece which places me into a peaceful summer afternoon, and there is a river along with me. Another is the third piece,  I feel familiar with the rhythm, and then I realize that it is the piece I chose to play in a contest last year. 

 

 

 

Let’s talk about the difference. Firstly, attending the concert forces me to listen to the music vigorously. Regularly, it is impossible for me to listen to the music without doing anything else. I find myself being able to discover more from the music when I listen to it in a formal situation. Usually, I will only notice the rhythm of the piece. While when I sit in the concert, I will try to imagine the image fits for the piece.

Secondly,  a concert gives me an opportunity to encounter new music pieces. I am kind of person really do not like accept unfamiliar stuff, always putting several songs in repeat. I realize I miss pretty many impressive pieces because of my habit. Thus, going to the concert is a desirable complement to me.                                                            

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Visual Music

As I entered the Great Hall, there was instructions about the way you should behave. I heard how you must turn off your phone, no pictures, no nothing, in which I completely agree with because that would be very

Photo by Maty Patino

disturbing to the rest of the audience. It is like being in the theater and seeing a person being on social media, might as well not go. While being at home, we do not get instructions on how to behave. One of the things I noticed was that in the program it did not say what songs he was going to play. It was a great experience because we do not know what to expect. When at home listening to music, we always know what song is coming up. However, at Tardelli’s concert, it was very intriguing not knowing what song he was going to play after.

When being on Spotify or apple music, you only get to listen to the singer’s voice. Unless you go on youtube and look at them recording their song, then you will get a feeling of how they felt during it. As I watched Tardelli, I was able to see his expressions and have a sense of what he felt like playing the song. Seeing the artist somehow made me feel as if I was playing the music. The faster he would play, or the “happier” the music, the more he would move. Tardelli would hardly look at what he was playing, which made me think that everything was coming from the heart.  He was expressing himself through music. Some of us do not need words, but sounds.

Photo by Maty Patino

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Tentative Ears

Let the music paint the picture for you.

By: Deja Cook- Reynolds

I never realized how much more moving music was without the words to distract you. At home, I listen to music, but just as a way to keep my attention or my energy up as I do other things that indeed to more focus. The words of the music that I listen to at home, have no real meaning behind them; they are just words being said to fit a beat, a rhythm, a population of people. Continue reading

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The Magic of the Music

Written by Emily Reeter

The guitar player, Marcus Tardelli, came to the city of Champaign-Urbana for the first time and performed a variety of phenomenal guitar pieces.  He was a natural talent, and played upbeat, emotional, and calming music so gracefully with his smooth fingers.  The atmosphere was different than anything I had been to before.  The guitar and the music streaming from it had the eyes and attention of every audience member.  The public was mesmerized by the notes, the performance, and the passion of the musician.  It was a giant, elegant hall filled with eager crowds, however, there was no chit chatting.  Just fascinated eyes and open ears.  It was unique and varied from music within my home because of the radiating high energy and passion.  If I were to listen music at home,  I’d most likely multitask and listen to the music, but mostly keep my focus on the activity at hand.  However, in this engaging environment the sounds were the focus.  Everyone was engulfed in the emotion and the culture of the music opposed to daily tasks and distractions. Also, in my household I tend to listen to the most popular hits or what’s trending, whereas at this event I got the opportunity to listen to a lot of different cultural music that was popular in other countries.  I enjoyed that because I wouldn’t normally be exposed to much diversity in the musical world.  It was an amazing experience that I wouldn’t have had access to in the comfort of my own, I’m glad I had the opportunity to take part in this performance at Krannert.

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The innerself search: taking off invisible covers

Written by Vlada Bazeliciuc

This week, we attended the exhibition of Erica Gressman at the Department of Latina/Latino

Studies. I was very surprised by the content of the exhibition.

When I came in, besides photographs of Erica Gressman, there were also 3 videos of her

performance. Two of the videos were similar to each other. Both videos were dark and sad. I

think in both videos Erica Gressman was trying to explore who she really is underneath the

mask that the society pressures her to wear.

But the third video was different – strange and unordinary.

I rewatched the third video multiple times and I had very mixed feelings about it. Erica Gressman was wearing few things of the doctor’s attire and smoldering makeup. During the course of the video, she was drilling her own stomach and later wires started to show in the spot of her “surgery”. Her costume and the presence of wires projects to disbelief in the modern technology in the medical field. The end of the video was even more disturbing, her face and hair were covered in white splatters that resembled male ejaculation. I think this last detail of the video points out to the rape incidents in the twenty-first century. Overall, the camera was always full and it was hard for me to make connections between the little details.

In addition to the videos, a set of 5 photographs were hung up on the wall. The photos were

very earthy and spiritual. Gressman was holding a sphere made out of sticks and feathers. I

think this set of photos was a cry for help. Gressman represented the society’s expectation

by that sphere and her head was completely inside it.

Of course, this exhibition was not like any other exhibition I had a chance to see. But it was

an interesting experience. I liked how Gressman’s art made me think of the actual meaning

of it and its meaning is probably different for each individual.

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My Experience Beyond the Exhibit

We attended the Latin House Gallery this week as a class and the artwork and displays were very different than what I had imagined.

Written by Emily Reeter

Going into this class trip, I thought that I would be encompassed with Latino inspired artwork with vibrant colors, character, and years of history.  However, I was surprised to have found some engaging videos, and art pieces that played immensely on emotions.  Some of the exhibits left students feeling intrigued, while others had people feeling very uncomfortable or uncertain about how to feel.

The most controversial exhibit was Gressman’s video and photos portraying a woman dressed in drag style, operating a surgery on her own body.  The video was gruesome, and at some points disturbing with heavy, punk rock music blaring in the background.  Throughout the video, she used a drill to open her womb and cut it up revealing her intestines and inner body parts.  That instant was already enough to make my stomach turn! But, as time went on she started to eat her intestines and smile while doing so.  The class was very confused on the direction of the video and the message she was trying to get across.

However, my personal take away from the creative, but graphic video, was that the woman doing that to her body wasn’t happy with herself, and was frankly uncomfortable in her own skin.  I think she wanted to demonstrated her disgust and disapproval with the audience.  She succeeded because everyone watching felt uneasy, and uncomfortable much like she probably felt in her position in life physically and mentally.

Another thing I also found intriguing about this exhibit was that they had a section called the “touch station”.  It had the real props from the filmed performance sprawled out for people to pick up and look at.  It was neat because it brought the film more to life and it helped imagine it more as a reality since everything was right there in front of you.

Overall I really enjoyed the exhibit and thought it was stimulating compared to other art programs I had attended.  All of the art was very different and although I thought it was morbid it got my brain working and asking questions.  I enjoyed how all of the exhibits were engaging and brought up unique conversations within the class.  It made my experience way more enjoyable and enhanced my understanding of the different pieces.

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The Power of One Glance-LAGRIME DI SAN PIETRO

 Written by Carol(Yining) Wei

LAGRIME DI SAN PIETRO, The tear of Saint Peter. This is an a cappella Renaissance masterpiece written by Orlando di Lassoand was performed by Los Angeles Master Chorale last Saturday night. The chorale did an excellent job express the intense human emotions in the show, including the anger and obscenity of the mob, the shame and regret of Saint Peter, and the immense pain of betraying a friend/a saint. The choreography was amazing and the body language perfectly illustrated the emotions and the ambience. The climax of this show was the moment Saint Peter rejected his belief in front of the mob and the sanctity of that one glance Jesus gave to Saint Peter. And then the regrets and desparation follows.

My favorite chapter is XV. Vattene vita va which translates to “Go away, life, go”. It was a touching scene depicting Saint Peter’s immense pain and struggle against the thought of suicide for his shame of betraying Jesus Christ. The chorale’s performance was wonderful. Their body and facial expressions were so convincing that it is as if they were going through the emotions of Saint Peter. It was an incredible scene and intrigued me into a lot of thoughts.

Photo credit: LA Master ChoraleBeing non-religious, I do not necessarily agree on the part of suicide being “an even greater sin”. In my opinion, suicide is a choice that every life has the right to make(and suicidal behavior has occurred in other species such as the lemmings, for higher survival rate of the whole species). Also, children did not choose to be born and given a life to, and thus should be granted the right to end it if they see the need to. It is a choice to die and go back to being part of the nature without human consciousness. We have always been here, and we will continue to exist. Every particle in me has been in the universe for billions of years, and will still be in the universe for billions of years to come. My consciousness as a Homo Sapiens could leave me, but my existence never leaves the world.

Also as a starter in French, I was happy to find connections between Italian and French. For instance, the word “vita” equals “vie” in French, and “va” also means to go in French. I just love to discover and learn the connections between languages, and possibly learn more about the cultures through those links. After going back home, I was lucky enough to find the album Lagrime di San Pietro on Spotify so I can still enjoy the pure beauty of this extrodinary chorus piece even after the performance.

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Silence in a Crowded Room

Written by Alyssa Pappas

Photo by A.Pappas

Last night I attended the Los Angeles Mast Chorale: Lagrime di San Pietro (Tears of St.Peter).  This eye-opening experience, truly showed me the impact that the silent pauses in between songs have on a performance.

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Transformation Through the Loss of Limbs

Written by Kamani Harris

Limbs carry large meaning within your life, as a piece of you that makes life easier, connects you to the earth, and connects you with other beings. But they can also represent deeper meanings such as negative and positive attachments, parts of who you are, and ones emotional stability. Continue reading

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“Limbs”: Transformative, Impactful, and Captivating

Written by: Nora Guerrero

Erica Gressman performing “Limbs”.

 

The Krannert Art Museum had the privilege of having Erica Gressman, artist, perform her piece “Limbs” for an audience much eager to watch and listen. At first sight, I thought the structure was a sculpture. It was not until I had a closer look that I could recognize that a human body was inside the costume. Was it one person? Or two? This was exactly what intrigued me from the start.

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Struggling with grief: A performance art

Written by Syed Ali

Erica Gressman, an artist based in Miami/Chicago, performed her art piece Limbs in the Krannert Art Museum, showcasing a range of motion and music. Limbs consisted of Gressman dangling on a wire, moving and struggling with confinement and facing detachment.

In the beginning of the performance, Gressman, wearing a gray reflective suit, made small movements and was overall still. It felt strange, but seemed very statue-like and beautiful in a way. Eventually, the movements became more clear and I saw that she had various limbs and faces; I felt completely entranced by the dim lights and atmospheric music. Continue reading

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Breaking Limbs at the Krannert Art Museum

Limbs, an intriguing and eerie performance by Erica Gressman at the Krannert Art Museum

Written by: Bill Xun

Photo by Bill Xun

When I first arrived at the Krannert Art Museum, I had no idea what to expect.  The gallery was packed, with people and lights surrounding a strange metal tripod with some sort of sculpture of a figure hanging underneath. The figure was an unmoving combination of limbs in white. What could it mean?

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Eric Gressman–Emotion of Limbs

Written by Tim Gao

In Krannert Art Museum, Gressman amazed all the audience.

Photo by Tim

Last night, Eric Gressman, an Chicago-based Latinx queer artist, introduce the audience to his art world.Using proficient body language, Gressman performed to give the audience a life message. Continue reading

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Self-Struggling, Self-Seeking and Self-Accepting: Limbs by Erica Gressman

Trapped in a “weird and even monster-liked” body, she was struggling, seeking, and finally, accepting.

Written by Zhenbang Wu.

Photo by Zhenbang Wu

Debuting at KAM, Limbs combined struggling movements and removal of limbs with violin-like electronic sound and lights, given by Chicago-based Latinx queer artist Erica Gressman. “There are a thousand Hamlets in a thousand people’s eyes.” As for me, it is all about self-struggling, self-seeking and self-accepting.

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Now What?

Photo by Maty Patino

As I sat down, I was trying to see whether it was two people or just Erica. The confusion intrigued me. Suddenly, everyone went silent, and I saw Erica began to move. Out of nowhere, she began to remove parts of herself. My first thought was that all the extra parts she had connected, the legs, arms, face, were the different perceptions that people had of her. Or the different “hopes” that people had upon her.

Photo by Maty Patino

Once she started twirling really fast, and uncontrollably, I knew it was more than what people thought about her. It was what she thought about herself and how she was trying to deal with it. During this time, I began to get goosebumps. “BOOM,” Erica hit herself in the back of the head. What now? Will the performance stop? No, Erica kept going. This further showed how no matter how hard something gets, you should never stop doing whatever you have to do to get wherever you want to get. Life does not stop for any of us, so why should we stop for anything?

Photo by Maty Patino

Towards the end of the performance is when everything hit me. What happens after we lose a limb? A special person? Are we really still the same? What did we learn? How do we move on? How do I seek for help? So many questions and no specific answer. Out of this performance, I got that everyone is going through something, whether is losing a person, losing a job, losing your home, anything. Loss is part of life, and we are unable to escape it. Whether it is putting a fake smile on, or expressing yourself through other mediums, we need to keep going no matter how hard things are.
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Dazed Paradox

Have you ever truly lived in the moment… Free of thought or even more important free of judgement?

By: Deja Cook- Reynolds

The performance by Erica Gressman: Limbs was, as I interpreted it, a performance about one living in the moment of their own skin. The shocking truth about how one is  just ” in it”, skin, and how everyone else around them is observing, looking, and critiquing it, skin, Continue reading