Category Archives: Uncategorized

Tiger

Jack Xiao

Tiger

Wild Tiger, the most abundant species among the Felidae, is an endangers species now. Deke Weaver, a writer-performer, designer, theater, and media artist, traveled to central India’s Pench National Park, which is one of India’s last sanctuaries for wild tigers and many other areas, such as the edge of the Bay of Bengal. After these travel experiences, Deke Weaver build a performance that shows a connection between animals and people.

Continue reading

FAA 110 Final Blog: A Fine Arts reflection

Written by Syed Ali

Before I joined FAA 110, I thought I wanted to take theater or drama classes. I enjoyed the expressive, abstract search for truth that is the fine arts. After I took this class, however, I learned that there is much more than theater in the world of art. I went to an opera, a musical, dance, orchestras, and various other forms of applied art. Because of this class, I went to an art museum for the first time and I truly loved it. I’m glad I took Fine & Applied Arts this semester; I learned not only about music/expression, but also about multimedia and how blogs are written. Continue reading

Creative Theater: Manual Cinema

Written by Syed Ali

Last week at the Krannert Center for Performing Arts, Manual Cinema performed a theatrical rendering of No Blue Memories – The Life of Gwendolyn Brooks. The performance involved a projector, puppets, and a live orchestra/band that brought various aspects together to create a vibrant display of Gwendolyn Brooks’ life.

Continue reading

Expressing views and absurdity through dance

Written by Syed Ali

Last week, the Krannert Center for Performing Arts held a dance performance choreographed by Cynthia Oliver. The performance, Virago-Man Dem, involved different stages of movement that worked in conjunction with a screen, spotlight, and flickering music.

 

 

 

Continue reading

Imagery and music: What Perlman and De Silva can invoke

Written by Syed Ali

This week, at the Krannert Center of the Performing Arts, world renowned musicians Itzhak Perlman and Rohan De Silva played various pieces in a violin-piano duo. Their music invoked various emotions and vivid imagery as they moved the entire audience.

Continue reading

Tragic Opera Night: La Boheme

Written by Syed Ali

On the last week of October, the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts presented the famed opera: La Bohèmecomposed by Giacomo Puccini. The opera and scene moved the audience to tears with its storytelling and music.

The stage held the orchestra underneath and the cast above, with stage props and lighting complementing the drama invoked by the music. The playful use of props made the opera feel more lifelike, especially in the beginning where Rodolfo and his friends (some of the main characters) casually swapped their red blanket and chairs. The characters relationships were portrayed from their singing and physical interactions; their expressions, movement, and voice inflection showed how they felt.

Continue reading

Instead of tragedy comes comedy tonight

Written by Syed Ali

Throughout the month of October, the Krannert Center of Performing Arts held the musical play A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. The play employed various jokes, expressions, and situations to bring out endless laughter from the audience. The slogan “Tragedy tomorrow, comedy tonight!” held true as the musical comedy made an interesting inquiry into freedom and making light of a situation.

Continue reading

Representing life in Chicago with Art

Written by Syed Ali

This week, the Krannert Art Museum held an exhibition, “Between the Buildings: Art from Chicago, 1930s – 1980s,”  that held various paintings and art sculptures representing Chicago/life in Chicago. Various artists created differing themes about what aspects of Chicago are most important and how they can be represented. Continue reading

Live Music: How music can move you

Written by Syed Ali

Marcus Tardelli, a Brazilian guitarist, held a reverb concert at the Krannert Center for Performing Arts on Wednesday, this week. His music and skill with the guitar moved the audience as he wove through several Brazilian songs/solos, creating different melodies and themes with every piece. 
Tardelli’s music and live performance was engaging and personal. When I listen to music at home, I usually pair it with actions such as doing homework or completing chores. Sometimes, but not all the time, I listen to music for the sake of just listening; I’ve rarely close-appreciated music before. The performance, however, required much more attention and focus than just listening to music at home.The large audience created a sense of pressure and the musician created varying levels of music that truly moved me.

 

Continue reading

The Power of One Glance-LAGRIME DI SAN PIETRO

 Written by Carol(Yining) Wei

LAGRIME DI SAN PIETRO, The tear of Saint Peter. This is an a cappella Renaissance masterpiece written by Orlando di Lassoand was performed by Los Angeles Master Chorale last Saturday night. The chorale did an excellent job express the intense human emotions in the show, including the anger and obscenity of the mob, the shame and regret of Saint Peter, and the immense pain of betraying a friend/a saint. The choreography was amazing and the body language perfectly illustrated the emotions and the ambience. The climax of this show was the moment Saint Peter rejected his belief in front of the mob and the sanctity of that one glance Jesus gave to Saint Peter. And then the regrets and desparation follows.

My favorite chapter is XV. Vattene vita va which translates to “Go away, life, go”. It was a touching scene depicting Saint Peter’s immense pain and struggle against the thought of suicide for his shame of betraying Jesus Christ. The chorale’s performance was wonderful. Their body and facial expressions were so convincing that it is as if they were going through the emotions of Saint Peter. It was an incredible scene and intrigued me into a lot of thoughts.

Photo credit: LA Master ChoraleBeing non-religious, I do not necessarily agree on the part of suicide being “an even greater sin”. In my opinion, suicide is a choice that every life has the right to make(and suicidal behavior has occurred in other species such as the lemmings, for higher survival rate of the whole species). Also, children did not choose to be born and given a life to, and thus should be granted the right to end it if they see the need to. It is a choice to die and go back to being part of the nature without human consciousness. We have always been here, and we will continue to exist. Every particle in me has been in the universe for billions of years, and will still be in the universe for billions of years to come. My consciousness as a Homo Sapiens could leave me, but my existence never leaves the world.

Also as a starter in French, I was happy to find connections between Italian and French. For instance, the word “vita” equals “vie” in French, and “va” also means to go in French. I just love to discover and learn the connections between languages, and possibly learn more about the cultures through those links. After going back home, I was lucky enough to find the album Lagrime di San Pietro on Spotify so I can still enjoy the pure beauty of this extrodinary chorus piece even after the performance.