Script: How to Fireproof Your Residence

4/30/2014

How to Fireproof Your Residence

Simple Preparations That Can Prevent a Fiery Disaster

TRT: 1:40

 

CG LOWERTHIRD-Charlie Maniates    CU CITIZEN ACCESS REPORTERLocator Lower Third

 

 

(still shot of alarm, shot of beeping, shot of opening to check batteries)

 

 

 

(show full shot, show each part described in track)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(wide then tight shot of sprinkler)

 

 

 

 

 

(show wide shot of heating materials, show materials stacked on it)

 

 

 

 

(show wide, then medium shot of candle. Show tight shot of candle extinguished)

 

 

 

 

 

(show materials on high shelf)

 

 

 

(Shot of extension cord. Tight shot of exposed/torn cord.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Show someone cooking, timer going off, the person is still there attending food.)

 

 

 

 

(Show shot of hammer, then window.)

 

 

 

 

 

(Show sped up video of step by step of escape plan from videographer’s point of view)

                      TRACK 1

A lot of fire hazards are easily preventable. Having a functioning fire alarm can alert you if there is a problem, preventing extensive damages. (0:08)

TRACK 2

Test your smoke alarm once a month by pressing the button on your alarm. Open the alarm and change the batteries twice a year. (0:06)

TRACK 3

If a fire does occur, have a fire extinguisher either in your residence or in the hallway of a multifamily residence.

Always know where it is. To use, pull the pin, aim the extinguisher at the base of the fire, squeeze the lever slowly and sweep from side to side. (0:13)

TRACK 4

Sprinkler systems help to put out a fire. Remember, the sprinkler will only go off in the room that it detects smoke. (0:06)

TRACK 5

Be aware of heating materials in your room. Keep space heaters away from other objects so they don’t heat up and catch on fire. Never stack clothes or other objects on top of the heater. (0:08)

TRACK 6

Don’t keep candles close to other objects either; heat from candles could cause glass to shatter.

Make sure the candles are completely extinguished when done using. (0:08)

TRACK 7

Keep grandchildren away from candles and other lighting devices. Make sure they’re out of their reach. (0:05)

TRACK 8

When plugging appliances in, don’t use extension cords permanently; they’re for temporary use.

Also make sure there are not frays or tears in the cords that could catch fire. (0:09)

TRACK 9

The biggest cause of residential fires is cooking materials. Don’t leave what you’re cooking unattended. It’s easy to forget about something on the stove, and it can get out of hand quickly. (0:08)

TRACK 10

It is helpful to keep a hammer in your room in case you are trapped in your room because of a fire. Use the hammer to break open the window to either escape or call for help. (0:08)

TRACK 11

Finally, always have an escape plan. Keep pathways clear for easy evacuation.

Check handles to see if they’re warm before exiting; you don’t want to move to a room closer to the fire.

 If you live with other people, plan where you will meet outside, such as by a stop sign or faraway tree. (0:14)

TRACK 12

Being prepared can prevent fires from getting out of hand. For CU-Citizen Access.org, I’m Charlie Maniates. (0:06)

 

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