Tag Archives: art

Music and Art

Farewell to FAA 110 and all the amazing experiences

Jessica Moreno

FAA 110 has been an amazing class. Before I started the class I was very closed to trying new things and I just wanted to stay in my comfort zone, but ever since this class started I realized that I should try new things to see what I like. This has truly been one of my favorite classes, and I really like how the class was set up. I’m not sure what I was expecting when I signed up but it sure wasn’t what I got. My advisor had told me it was just an easy course to get credits, and I had signed up just for that reason but my outcome was amazing from this class. I met new people, I experienced thing that on my own I know I would have never done and I went to places that when I first got here I thought I would go once or twice, but I ended up going 10+. This was an amazing class and I am glad I got to take it and experience what I did.

These are the events I attended:

-Buddy Guy

-Chris Botti

-Jennifer Monson

-Baile Latino

-Homecoming Concert

-Wynton Marsalis

Tiger

-The Nature of Forgetting

Farewell to FAA 110

Written by Ashleigh Cox

The first photo I took at KCPA!

As ready as I am for the upcoming semester to begin, I’m going to be very sad to leave behind FAA 110. Anyone of my peers has heard me talk about this class at least eight times because I enjoyed it so much. Having a class that was more focused on making me think about the different parts that go into performance and had very little work to go with it was very good for my mental health and the first semester of my college career.

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Abstract Art at its Finest [Makeup Event]

Written by: Benjamin Tan

The art talk this time was entirely on abstract art. This was one area that I could not understand or appreciate.

However, after the art talk, I was much more informed on how to actually appreciate abstract art. These are the few tips I would like to share with you!

Firstly, it is the biography of the artist. Understanding where they came from and how they were raised from young can really give you a depiction of what kind of abstract they will be painting and also what is the effect that they want to draw out from their painting.

Secondly, It is the brush strokes. If you start to lean in and observe each of the abstract painting, you can start to see the different gestures that were used in each of the brush strokes. This makes viewing the abstract art even more interesting as you start to ponder what kind of emotions the artist was having when he/she did that brush stroke on this corner of the painting.

Thirdly, which is the most interesting is the grid. Every abstract art will always have a formula for a grid. Some questions that can help facilitate your pondering of the art will be is the grid dominating the whole painting? Is the grid symmetrical or is it distorted?

During the art show, there were 3 abstract paintings that were showcased.

Louise Fishman Abstract Art, 1995

For Louise Fishman, one thing really unique about her art is that the brush strokes were actually many different objects that were removed from the painting to give that really special brush stroke to the abstract art.

Purvis Young Abstract Art, 1990

For Purvis Young, he will use any kind of material and objects in his abstract and as shown above, he used carpet this time round for his abstract art.

 McArthur Binion Abstract Art, 1990

For McArthur Binion, the interesting fact of his abstract was that he used his own birth certificate for all the 4-inch squares in the art. Also, if you look more closely, you will actually see an oval in the painting too!

Overall, I was really glad to go for this art talk to learn about the wondrous world of abstract art.

Art Since 1948 – History of Abstract Art

Written by: Laura Chong

How do we tell stories? For these 3 artists, their stories were told through abstract art. Integrated with their life experiences in the 1900s, these are truly interesting art pieces.

Art talk series: 3 artists & their abstract art pieces

This art talk made me appreciate abstract art so much more. I realized they are about the engagement of materials, the process when creating the art piece and the stories you are trying to tell.

Artist 1: Louise Fishman, 1995

Louise Fishman is a Russian Jewish Lesbian woman who arrived in New York in the 1960s. Her abstract expressionism emphasizes black, white and minimalism. In this painting, she used different materials to transfer the paint away from the canvas. I could see a woman leaning backwards, which could be a representation of herself and the society.

Artist 2: Purvis Young, 1990

Purvis Young is a African American self taught artist. His life mission was to visualize injustice, therefore, he studied protest art. His style of painting was the use of anything as a canvas, including plywood. In this painting, he used carpet as the borders and painted on a plywood. The ship could represent a move into a collective society.

Artist 3: McArthur Binion, 1990

McArthur Binion is a African American born in 1956. He has a DNA series where he used materials that tells his story into his work. In this painting, he teared up his birth certificate and used it in the grids. There is an oval drawn in the middle which represents how the background and foreground is playing with each other – just like our life stories.

All in all, abstract paintings take a long process and is very labored. There are a lot of thoughts put into it and it is up to individuals on how you interpret the painting. I really enjoyed this art talk as it opened up my mind to a much deeper world of abstract art.

Radioactive Art (Make-Up Event #2)

Written by Ashleigh Cox

A wall of photos in the exhibit!

Krannert Art Museum’s second ArtTalk discussed the way we get rid of nuclear waste. The curator, Lilah Leopold, focused on a few different pieces and explained the intention of the exhibit from the artists’ point of view.

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First-Ever Art Talk at KAM! (Make-Up Event #1)

Written by Ashleigh Cox

KAM from the outside!

I went to the Krannert Art Museum’s first-ever Art Talk and learned a lot about African Art and it’s movement throughout the Western world. The curator talked about several pieces from different regions as well as their significance to the cultures they originally came from.

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Spirit of “Dance”

Written by Nicole Miao

Although this workshop was titled “Dance”, it was more like a journey about our soul. It gave me plenty of time to feel my inner changes and explore the deeper philosophical implications of art.

People gathered outside the KAM

We stopped outside Krannert Art Museum and Ms. Monson requested us to close our eyes and feel which direction is north. Then we each looked for and turned to the direction of our hometown. Ms. Monson let us feel the sounds from a distance or close by, looking for objects that emitted these sounds, and moving in the direction of their movement. In such a quiet environment, I clearly heard the rumble of cars driving across the road, the rustle of wind blowing through the leaves, and the screaming of birds in the sky, which made me feel relaxed and calm down.

A three-minute “Dance” experience

After entering the museum, Ms. Monson took us to a gallery and let us find a partner. Each person had three minutes to close their eyes and do whatever they want. I chose to lie on the ground and stretch my body, which made me feel comfortable because I usually sit to study and my back could not be relaxed.

I was observing an artwork

In the third session, Ms. Monson asked us to choose one from different activities and work with our partner. My partner and I wanted to observe and draw the life cycle of the material of a work of art. We chose a painting, and I thought about where the oil paint came from. I painted the process I imagined on paper to share with others.

Drawing by me and my partner

This workshop was so unique that I couldn’t find a similar event. I was very grateful for this special experience, which taught me a new way of feeling art.

Dance into Art!

Wai Chuen Chan
10/6/2019

Jennifer Monson brought us to experience art through dance and movement at Krannert Art Museum.

Jennifer Monson is an American dancer and choregrapher. On October 3, she showed us a new way to interpret art during her dance workshop at Krannert Art Museum. She had brought us to use not vision, but dance and movement to feel the art, which you may find a experience you have never had.

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Moving to the Groove of Art

Jennifer Monson shares her insight on how movement of the body can change the experience of art. 

written by Allison Spillane

Introduction to the Workshop

This experience was a new one. Previous shows that this class had scheduled I had some semblance of expectation, but I went into Jennifer Monson’s dance workshop having no preconceptions of what we would be doing. Having absolutely no background knowledge of dance, I must admit I was somewhat apprehensive about the activities she had in store. However, despite my fears, I found the movement in this event quite refreshing. The lense of dance really changed the way that I experienced the art.

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Moving with Art

By Jessica Moreno

Jennifer Monson Talking to us at the beginning of the workshop.

On Thursday October 3rd at the Krannert Art Museum we went to a dance Workshop taught by Jennifer Monson. This experience was unlike any other and it felt very freeing and liberating. I had never gone to a dance workshop and going to this one was unlike anything I thought it would be.

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