Tag Archives: chris botti

The Journey of Art

For the very first time of my life, the art of milestone has been made with Fine and Applied Arts 110.

By Wai Chuen Chan

Krannert Art Opening Night Party – The first event I attend throughout this course.

It has been a wondering experience with FAA 110. Remembering when I first registered this course, I have known it is related to arts, but nothings more. The more the time passed, I have learned this class is lovely easy going and interestingly attractive. During the lecture, I have made friends easily with the environment where other classes can never be compared with. Everyone in the class was friendly and admirable. They were also come back different backgrounds and cultures which enrich my sight towards exotic countries.

Fine and Applied Arts 110 have also given me the great opportunity to touch arts in the closest moment. I have gotten to attend eight art events throughout the course, which would definitely be zero if I changed my mind at the first place. And the way arts presented to us is numerous, I have experienced arts through body, movement, vision, sound, etc. I am really looking forwards to experience arts in a different way.

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A Look Back at the Semester

By Luke Garza

Fist impressions matter. Going into FAA 110, I had no idea what to expect as a college freshman. Hearing that I would have to attend mandatory events was pretty shocking but after the first one, the events felt much less mandatory and I found myself looking forward to going to the KCPA every week.

Buddy Guy Merch Stand

We started off very strong with a performance from Buddy Guy. Buddy Guy’s performance was very personal and interactive, he took moments to joke and chat with the audience, he even walked through the seating area. Out of all the performances we saw, I’m glad this was the first. Buddy Guy gave us a taste of how unique all the performances we had in store for us truly were.

Chris Botti on stage

Chris Botti was a very interesting performance, he was loud and energetic his whole performance. You could really see how passionate he was about playing the trumpet. His concert incorporated a lot of motion on his part, while he played you could see him move his body in reaction to the notes he was hitting. For example, whenever he got louder he would lean back into it almost as if he was projecting himself more. On top of this, the other musicians really complemented his own playing.

Home before the play

Our first narrative style event was a play called Home. It was about a group of people all living in the same home, but they don’t know the others are living there. They each lead their own lives without ever noticing the others. The end of the play was where things really got wacky though. They started selecting audience members to join the stage cast, and I was one of those randomly selected. I didn’t expect to slow dance with a guy in a chicken suit of all things that night.

Outside the Krannert Art Museum

Jennifer Monson’s Dance Workshop was our first event not at the KCPA and also our first fully interactive event. We waled all around the Krannert Art Museum moving our bodies and analyzing artwork to better understand art and dance. Interpretation is much harder when you have to used your body to convey a message. It was a great chance of pace and it felt good to move around and interact with my peers outside of class time.

Gem of the Ocean’s Main Stage

Gem of the Ocean was a narrative play about one man’s quest to have his soul cleansed for his sins. It was very story driven, the characters had meaningful interactions and backstories, some were elaborated on or revealed later in to the play through meaningful parts. Their motives were very clear and their actors assumed the roles as if they were actually them. They played their characters so well it felt as if the audience also developed a relationship with them, me personally I came to dislike the sadistic character the most, for his actions against the main characters and the side characters.

The Illinois Wind Symphony in costume

The Illinois Wind Symphony was an event that I went to see on my own, I went with a friend because she had an extra ticket and I definitely enjoyed the experience. I think what most popped out was how the entire band was in costume for the first half for the Halloween spirit. Not only did they look incredible, but they sounded equally as amazing, and when they brought out the saxophone quartet, everything got exponentially better. I’d say this had to be one of my favorite events, it was all around a great experience and I would definitely want to go see them play again.

Just before the concert

Jazz at the Lincoln Center was a good follow up to the Wind Symphony, while there were no costumes, there was still great music. All the artists complemented each other very well, everyone felt as if the had a role to fill and they filled it so well. The highlights were definitely the solos performed by the individual musicians. They would stand up, shifting to being the center of attention while playing louder. Overall I think they had incredible synergy and excellent standalone parts.

Seats early before the play

The Nature of Forgetting was our final event, a play about a man with dementia reliving his life memories of his deceased wife. It really captures the erratic nature of memory as he jumps from memory to memory, seeming lost in his own mid. He darts from the classroom, to the street on his bike, to his wedding day, and eventually back to the present. You can see his distress in his character’s actions, the emphasis on memory through the mist and the light focusing on certain spots, they really do an excellent job setting the mood the entire time.

Overall, this semester was full of many incredible events, many of which I’d see again given the chance. I can’t recommend this class enough, from the events to the Professors, everthing was amazing.

Farewell to FAA 110

Written by Ashleigh Cox

The first photo I took at KCPA!

As ready as I am for the upcoming semester to begin, I’m going to be very sad to leave behind FAA 110. Anyone of my peers has heard me talk about this class at least eight times because I enjoyed it so much. Having a class that was more focused on making me think about the different parts that go into performance and had very little work to go with it was very good for my mental health and the first semester of my college career.

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Master of His Craft

Chris Botti blows away the crowd at the Tryon Festival Theater!

Although I was sick, and was unable to stay the entire show, Chris Botti’s performance was a spectacle to behold.  My favorite part of the performance would probably be the drummer. I always have respect for people who have range within their instruments, and the quiet, subtle beats that the drummer was able to produce set against his moments of intense and creative drum solos was spectacular. Another aspect of the drummer that I liked so much was that he looked like he was genuinely having fun on stage. Between the intimidatingly stylish Botti and his beautiful and calm violinist, the drummer stood out to me as someone who was there to have a great time doing what he loves. 

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Chris Botti and Company Bring a Musical Explosion

The grammy award-winning trumpeter shows Champaign-Urbana his talents

Written by Edward Huang

Botti with his band of young talents performing a lively jazz mashup

On a calm Saturday night, the guests of Krannert Center for Performing Arts waited eagerly for the appearance of Chris Botti, the renowned trumpeter, to make his way onto the stage. I watched as he made his entrance, but I was caught off by the number of other musicians that he brought along with him. As an appreciator of all music styles, I was excited to see what they had in store.

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Trumpets in Krannert? Chris Botti did it Better.

Written by Luke Garza

Chris Botti standing briefly.

On Saturday the 14th, Chris Botti came to perform in the Krannert Center for Performing Arts, and along with him he brought an equally talented Violinist, Pianist, Drummer, and even a Saxophone player. These weren’t just background performers, however. I feel as if Chris Botti did an amazing job as highlighting them as individual artists that went along with his own trumpet playing.

The restless crowd before the performance.

I feel as my favorite part of Chris Botti’s performance was how incredibly powerful he sounded as a trumpet player. It felt as if every note he played echoed throughout the auditorium as we watched him lean into every breath he took through his instrument. His interaction with the crowd was equally amazing. I feel as if the audience had a sort of “moment” when he stepped down to talk to us. It gave the whole interaction a much more personal feel, something I haven’t experienced in concert.

Moments before the lights dimmed

Overall, Chris Botti had great complementary artists, greater sound, and an enthusiastic crowd. You could tell how invested we were from our constant applause, and I feel like Chris Botti delivered a performance worthy of such. There is a stereotype that trumpet players are very prideful, yet Chris Botti has shown us that is simply not true.

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Krannert Center: Chris Botti

Chris Botti and his curating powers

His artistry shook the Tryon Festival Theatre!

Written by César Díaz Blanco

Chris Botti performing among the audience as the show gets to an end.

Botti left the audience in awe with the extraordinary help of Lee Pearson in the drums, Holger Marjamaa in the piano, Reggie Hamilton in the bass, among other great artists.

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Chris Botti: The Power of Jazz

Written by Ashleigh Cox

Chris Botti watches the drummer play

On September 14th, Chris Botti performed at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts with a group of talented jazz musicians. The powerful music filled Tryon Festival Center and took a variety of tempos, tones, and styles to transform this performance into something special.

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Chris Botti – The Trumpet Master!

Chris Botti performed a series of Jazz with his band at Night in Krannert Center.

Wai Chuen Chan
9/17/2019

On September 14, Chris Botti featuring Lee Pearson, Reggie Hamilton, Leonardo Amuedo, Holger Marjamaa, Andy Snitzer, Anastasiia Mazurok, Sy Smith, and Rafael Moras, performed a series of Jazz music including Botti’s album with diverse musical instruments at Tryon Festival Theatre in Krannert Center.

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Chris Botti Blows Crowd Away!

By Rachel Yao

Chris Botti, featuring Lee Pearson, Andy Snitzer, Anastasiia Mazurok, and more, perform at the Tryon Festival Theatre on September 14th, 2019.

Tickets for Chris Botti outside of Tryon Festival Theatre.
A view from the balcony of Chris Botti playing his trumpet and Andy Snitzer playing his saxophone.

I was quite fascinated by Chris Botti’s playing and skill. Each note he played was very clear and had good dynamic. He could gracefully switch the mood of the song; he would play a loud forte, then suddenly bring the volume down to a soft mezzo piano. Moreover, I was also amazed by the other musicians and singers that were featured in the performance. Andy Snitzer, the saxophonist, played various scales swiftly during his solo. His body movement also lightened the mood of the song to be more cheerful and jazzy. Anastasiia Mazurok, the violinist, performed her solo elegantly, with each note flowing to the next. Lastly, Sy Smith, a singer, had a very nice voice that harmonized with the rest of the band.

Out of all the outstanding performances, I think Lee Pearson’s drum solo may be my favorite part of the performance. I found it very entertaining and captivating as he displayed much of his skill within a short period of time. He exhibited cool tricks with his drumsticks, like balancing them on top of his head while playing, throwing them up in the air, and using his hands to play the drum set.

Sy Smith (bottom left) and Chris Botti (bottom right) interacting with the audience while performing.

Near the end of the performance, Chris Botti and Sy Smith go off stage to interact with the audience. Botti continued to play his trumpet while Smith came onto stage with her strong, powerful voice. People quickly got out their cameras and phones to take pictures. I thought the way they interacted with the audience, whether it be having conversations or walking into the crowd, really engaged the viewers throughout the performance.

For more info: https://krannertcenter.com/events/chris-botti