Tag Archives: Colwell Playhouse

A Life of Run!!! (Makeup Event)

The Long Run presents by Tere O’ Connor was performing on Colwell Playhouse at Krannert Center for the Performing of Arts.

By Wai Chuen Chan

On November 21, the Long Run directed by Tere O’ Connor, with the performers of Simon Courchel, Eleanor Hullihan, Emma Judkins, Heather Olson, Silas Riener, Matthew Rogers, Lee Serle and Jin Ju Song-Begin, performed on Colwell Playhouse at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts.

Colwell Playhouse.
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The Complexities of a Home [Make-Up]

Written by Raymond Diaz

Home, by Geoff Sobelle, is a captivating performance partnered with illusion and intricate engineering that builds a house right before your eyes and shows the complexities of what it is like for people living like anyone else. Through this there was relatability and allowed the audience to experience the questions of what is home and when do we know it is a home?

https://krannertcenter.com/events/home-geoff-sobelle

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A Beautiful Unravelling of the Mind

Written by Raymond Diaz

Theatre Re: The Nature of Forgetting performs what it is like for someone who is in the early stages of having dementia. It details the story of a middle aged man dealing with the repercussions of having his memory begin to deteriorate due to dementia, and the cast and musical performances convey this beautifully.

https://krannertcenter.com/events/theatre-re-nature-forgetting

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Forget

Written by: César Díaz Blanco

The Nature of Forgetting’s choreography, lights, set pieces, music, and more left everyone at the Colwell Playhouse in awe. It is impressive how most of the play happened in a small block of wood, and with only four “full time” actors and two part-musicians/actors. Definitely, a revolutionary idea, with a fully accomplished execution.

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The Nature of Forgetting

Written by Ashleigh Cox

Tom expresses his frustration!

The Nature of Forgetting is a powerful play about a man’s memory fading with Alzheimer’s and how it appears from his point of view. Theatre Re performed the piece at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts on November 12th and it was quite a memorable event!

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Freedom and the Odds Forced Against It

Written by Raymond Diaz

Gem of the Ocean is a production brought to you by Krannert Center of the Performing Arts. It chronicles an early period in Pittsburgh where a character by the name of Aunt Ester is said to have ‘supernatural’ abilities in which she is capable of cleansing one’s soul. Throughout the play we are introduced to this idea and follow along as we see her come to understand what the newcomer Citizen Barlow has to offer, and his affect on their community as a whole. All the while reeling us in and using their stage to connect us with their story.

https://krannertcenter.com/events/gem-ocean

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Back home

Written by César Díaz Blanco

Geoff Sobelle’s dreamlike play took the Colwell Playhouse audience by surprise. Wood frames and staples started what would become home or a memory of it. The uncoherent scenes at the beginning sparked the curiosity of the viewers, necessary for the rest of the play. Then, the harmony of the life of the residents made us relate to them. Finally, the familiarity with the house made us dwellers.

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Home, Sweet Home

Best Show I’ve ever Watched

Written by Zhengqi Xu

Home became the best show I’ve ever watched last week. It was abusolutely amazing for me and, I believe, for everyone. Everything about the show including the actors, scenes, and plays.

Helping actors hang lights with other the other audience to decorate the theatre

At first, I was confused with the meaning of the story the show was trying to tell, so I was trying hard to understand every details the show displayed. At the same time, I was surprised by the tricks the actors were doing. They could just change themselves to another actor by hide themselves for a second, and that was the point I started getting interested in the show.

The band coming down to the floor and interacting with us

Later, I was getting into the story of the show. Home was telling a story about a home in which several people live. All these people seemed unrelated in the first place, but they were actually interrelated to each other. The interactions between each roles were really sweet and I felt a sense of warm inside the theatre.

Some of us getting invited to the stage and participate as part of the show

At last, we were hyped by the plot where they invited plenty of the audience to the stage and participate. There was a scene depicted a night when everyone inside the house invited all kinds of friends to have a large party. I must say I enjoyed the plot so much that I was smiling all the time towards the end.

In the end, all the audience stood up and applauded for all the actors who showed up. Home is not just a show for me, but a real sweet home that night.

Geoff Sobelle shows us the meaning of a Home

By Luke Garza

On September 27th, the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts showcased the play Home in the Colwell Playhouse. The play slowly evolved from the silent story of one man who had built a house, the the stories of several people, each living out their own lives in the same home, unaware of the other’s very existence. Towards the end, even the audience became a central role in the amazing play, both in on stage participation and in helping to set the mood for the scene.

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Home by Geoff Sobelle

By Rachel Yao

Geoff Sobelle’s “Home” showcases a mix of music and theatre while building a house from scratch at Colwell Playhouse in KCPA on September 27th, 2019.

A mix of actors and audience members on stage in the house built during the play.

“Home” starts off with a man wondering around on stage, picking up lanterns, and building a small wall out of wood and plastic sheets. As the play goes on, more characters start appearing, including the construction workers who quickly built a house in front of our very eyes. There was a bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, dining room, living room, and office within the house. Room decor, like pictures and vases, and furniture, like couches and desks, decorated the home while the residents unpacked. The stage quickly transformed into a warm home with ambient noises, wind blowing, leaves ruffling, and dog barking, mixed with realistic lighting that portrayed day and night.

Beginning of the play, where the man builds a wall made of wood and plastic sheets.

As the story unfolds, we see the daily life of each resident, from waking up to doing chores to arguing with each other. Seeing each resident live their own lives made me think and reflect on my own experiences at home. The play made me think about my morning routine and hectic schedules that I follow on a daily basis back at home and in my dorm at university. At the end of the play, the residents one by one began packing their belongings and moving out. This act made me think about the time I was moving from Minnesota to California, and then moving to university in Illinois. As a result, I could sympathize with the actors as they portrayed their lives.

Actors and audience members performing a scene where the residents were packing up to move out.

To my surprise, the actors also interacted with the audience throughout the play, whether it was offering food and drinks, asking for people to stand and hold strings of lights, singing happy birthday, or bringing them on stage to be part of the act. It made the audience feel cheerful, as if they were also a part of or invited to the party. I thought this strengthened the connection between the audience and the actors to create a lasting impression and to sympathize with them by drawing more of the audience’s attention to the scene.

Audience members standing to hold up strings of lights to be hung from the balcony.
Actors and audience members in a scene after a party where they mourn over a death.

More info on “Home” by Geoff Sobelle: https://krannertcenter.com/events/home-geoff-sobelle