Starting the journey of arts –Final Reflection

Starting the journey of arts

FAA 110 is the first general education course for me at U of I. I had a great time taking this course.

By Rui.

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San Fransisco Symphony

Darian Moore

Preparing for the show

If we had not had the talk on Monday I do not think these pieces would have impacted me. After having that talk it forced me to think about what this music meant to people who are not me. Although I was not specifically interested in classical music I realized there are people who are. While listening to each piece something that resonated with me was the performers love for the music and keeping it alive and the hard work they put into it.

The whole Symphony

My favorite piece was the first piece because I enjoyed the fast pace of the piece. I also thought it was interesting hearing pieces that I recognized in the performance.

Visually I was very interested in the violinist Alexander Kerr. We had learned about him in class and he was a guest, so I thought it was really interesting to see him spotlighted. Something else that was very visually noticeable was the energy put into each piece. The performers put so much energy into their music. It really makes you consider how much time and effort is put into their performances to coordinate with each other and perfect each one.

Ticket and Playbill

Latrelle Bright’s Direction of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time

By Nancy Ibarra Medrano

My evening began with a haste to the theatre. The for-shadowing of this play by its director, Latrelle Bright, instilled my own curiosity in its ever-present themes of motion and space. Space being interpreted as both the outer universe and the creativity in placement of props and people on stage. The movement was lively. The unorthodox nature of the corps presence on stage continued to expand upon the totality of what can be interpreted from this performance. Thankfully, I was greeted at the door by Dr. Collins with the spare tickets in hand.

A pair, a play.

The title of the play was my first signal of just how different this performance would be. The elongated name and thoughtful preface led me to believe the story would follow a strict mystery plot. I was happily surprised by a novel perspective on the coming of age tale of a young boy triumph over autism. Not only was the storyline engaging, the craft of the set design and movement also brought the audience that much closer to the main character, Christopher. The attention to detail in the integrated communications of all design aspects was evident in how closely each aspect of the play followed the themes of Christopher’s mind. An example of this was evident in the geometric shapes that were used to showcase and populate the stage. The lights were also an example of the transport the audience went through when Christopher spoke about his love for space. The stage was filled with stars and color to accommodate Christopher’s meticulous imagination. These details allowed for the complete immersion into the mind of Christopher. These connection engulfed the audience in the internal battle and aspirations of the protagonist.

An unkept feeling.

My familiarity with this disorder gave me an even better understanding of the livelihood of Christopher and his parents. The portrayal of Christopher’s struggles paralleled the experiences that close family friends of mine have also faced. The message of endless opportunity for people of the spectrum was prominent, but there were also mirror images in the way a person could relate to the emotions that a person with ASD has. Christopher’s father reactions often embodied the clutch to bad habits and bursts of rage. I believe this allowed the audience to relate more closely with Christopher and develop a deeper understanding of his condition.

To be closer.

The entire production invoked an emotional adventure to me and to many of its audience members. The thoughtfulness in direction was evident and innovative. I believe this performance has a consistent ability to impact its audience. The creative decisions facilitated a captivating experience that I believe will always resonate with audience members.

Intermission.

Renee Baker: Everything Influences Everything

By Nancy Ibarra Medrano

This week, the Exploring Creativity in the Arts class had guest speaker, Renee Baker come in to share her story as a renowned composer creating a platform for women and people of color in the world of fine arts.

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FAA 110 Final Blog: A Fine Arts reflection

Written by Syed Ali

Before I joined FAA 110, I thought I wanted to take theater or drama classes. I enjoyed the expressive, abstract search for truth that is the fine arts. After I took this class, however, I learned that there is much more than theater in the world of art. I went to an opera, a musical, dance, orchestras, and various other forms of applied art. Because of this class, I went to an art museum for the first time and I truly loved it. I’m glad I took Fine & Applied Arts this semester; I learned not only about music/expression, but also about multimedia and how blogs are written. Continue reading “FAA 110 Final Blog: A Fine Arts reflection”

A Musical Love Story

An amazing musical performance that walked the audience through a story of a doomed romance. The emotions were just flowing this Saturday during Itzhak Perlman’s performance.

Written by: Fatimah Ibidunni Continue reading “A Musical Love Story”

Instead of tragedy comes comedy tonight

Written by Syed Ali

Throughout the month of October, the Krannert Center of Performing Arts held the musical play A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. The play employed various jokes, expressions, and situations to bring out endless laughter from the audience. The slogan “Tragedy tomorrow, comedy tonight!” held true as the musical comedy made an interesting inquiry into freedom and making light of a situation.

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“Something For Everyone…A Comedy Tonight!”

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Written By: Fatimah Ibidunni

If this class keeps going at this rate, I am going to go to every theater production that the Krannert Center for Performing Arts puts on because… WOW. Click below to read more about the amazing performance at Krannert this Thursday. Continue reading ““Something For Everyone…A Comedy Tonight!””

Live in Color

Music is the muse of enjoyment. Now, pair that with food, people, beautiful lights, and you have created a moment for people to live.

By: Deja Cook- Reynolds

Opening Night at the Krannert Center for Performance Arts was a better experience than I thought it was going to be. I couldn’t believe the amount of people that were there; kids, college students, professors, etc. were all in the same space just enjoying the atmosphere. I loved seeing that.  I think the live music and the diversified food venders did a wonderful job of pulling people in and inviting them into a open space where they could just be themselves, not worry about outside judgment, and try new things! Honesty, I think that was the most enjoyable about the night, the open space and the freedom for people to be themselves.

A gloomy day never stops the precious and serenity of enjoyment

Ranky Tanky

Opening Night: 50th Anniversary