Tag Archives: Foellinger Great Hall

(Extra Credit) University Band Representing Us All

Written by Zhengqi Xu

As shown in the title, this show called Campus and University Band featured a band consists of undergraduate and graduate students from the University of Illinois, which means this band represents all the students and it made me feel warm to watch them perform.

The beautiful ticket and the envelop

To be honest, there were not a lot of people there to watch the performance tonight, and I was surprised to find out the hall wasn’t close to full at all. After thinking through the possible reason, I suppose that students might be busy on a Sunday night, especially during the final week. Otherwise, people would love to watch a show like the University Band.

Students preparing for the show

The show turned out to be a success, and it was lovely to see a lot of students here to support their friends on the stage. One thing I noticed was that all the music played are written not long ago, which are all from the 20th and the 21th century. Although people might prefer to listen to music from a long time ago, but it was a pleasure to taste some modern music.

The playlist of the show with a nice cover

I wasn’t abe to stay for the whole show and had to leave during halftime because of a meeting. However, I enjoyed the show so much that I felt pitty the moment I left the entrance. The University band did a great job of showing that students can never be ignored and could be comparable to some of the greatest people in the world. And, I’m so proud of those students who provide us a great show tonight.

Jazz for the Win

Written by Zhengqi Xu

Jazz has always been something that I’m interested in and Chris Botti has already amazed me last time. Last week I was lucky enough to watch another show presented by Wynton Marsalis and his band, which gave me a whole new experience with Jazz music.

Tickets of the show while entering the Foellinger Great Hall

The show featured both ensemble playing and solo showcase. The combination of the two factors was something I had never seen during a Jazz performance. At that night, the band usually start with group playing, and musicians would go by different order to show us a solo part of several instruments. After a part was finished, Wynton Marsalis would introduce the musicians who just played solo to us to let the audience get familiar with each of them. This kind of performance really let us interact with everyone specifically in the band instead of listening to a whole group of people without knowing them in detail.

The moment I just entered the hall waiting for the show to start

The show was completely different from the show by Chris Botti. Wynton Marsalis gave us a show that was more of a traditional Jazz performance with everyone dressed officially and present us with all kinds of things that were originally included in Jazz. Chris Botti’s show was more of a modern Jazz performance on the other hand. All of them dressed causally and I found them to be a city band in a society that fits the world today. Also, their instruments are more modern and I even saw electric guitar during the show.

Wynton Marsalis’ show attracts hundreds of people

The show didn’t have a specifically one moment that stood out to me, but the show itself had already surprised me with the valuable experience. I haven’t watched a traditional band performance in years and I nearly forgot how they performed. Wynton Marsalis reminded me of all the shows I had seen before when I was young and I was just missing a lot of things during the show.

The Father of Modern Jazz and his Ensemble Roar Vibrantly and Passionately

Performing a Happy Birthday composition for one of their Trombone players

Written by Raymond Diaz

Attendees eagerly arriving and waiting for Wynton Marsalis

Wynton Marsalis has crafted music for over thirty years not only alone but with his diverse ensemble. Bringing together some of the best jazz soloists together to form a group that really develops and hones their compositions to bring together something that really allows the audience to listen and appreciate what they have mastered. In this 2 hour performance, accompanied by a 20 minute intermission in between, we were presented with various compositions, both original and pieces added with a unique flavor, that really showed why Wynton Marsalis and his ensemble have achieved as much as they have.

https://krannertcenter.com/events/jazz-lincoln-center-orchestra-wynton-marsalis

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Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis

Written by César Díaz Blanco

Wynton Marsalis is a trumpeter and director whose skills left the Foellinger Great Hall in awe. Leading the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra is not an easy work, but Marsalis created a synergic experience in which every member shone whenever a solo performance made everyone applaud. The structure of the melodies played were perfect for building up either a strong joint piece or a striking solo. The mastery of the artists got a well-deserved double standing ovation at the end.

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Merry Celebratory at Krannert

by Alia Muhammad Radzi

Ticket to the Performance

The 50th Anniversary Krannert Center Performing Arts Celebration was done with tranquil and serene music. This event was led by Wilson Poffenberger, a student from the school of music who was selected based on his skills during recital auditions. I don’t think I have ever seen a performance where at the center of it was a saxophone player.

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San Fransisco Symphony

Darian Moore

Preparing for the show

If we had not had the talk on Monday I do not think these pieces would have impacted me. After having that talk it forced me to think about what this music meant to people who are not me. Although I was not specifically interested in classical music I realized there are people who are. While listening to each piece something that resonated with me was the performers love for the music and keeping it alive and the hard work they put into it.

The whole Symphony

My favorite piece was the first piece because I enjoyed the fast pace of the piece. I also thought it was interesting hearing pieces that I recognized in the performance.

Visually I was very interested in the violinist Alexander Kerr. We had learned about him in class and he was a guest, so I thought it was really interesting to see him spotlighted. Something else that was very visually noticeable was the energy put into each piece. The performers put so much energy into their music. It really makes you consider how much time and effort is put into their performances to coordinate with each other and perfect each one.

Ticket and Playbill

The One and Only San Francisco Symphony

By: Stephany Valdez

“If you’re alive, you have all the experience necessary to understand classical music” – Michael Tilson Thomson, music director of San Francisco Symphony

My ticket and brochure for the performance.
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Tai Ji and Western Classical: A Clashing of Worlds

Krannert Center presents the Jupiter String Quartet accompanying Tai Ji master Chungliang Al Huang and company

By: Aditya Kashyap

The audience fills the Foellinger Great Hall

Upon first arriving for the performance, I was curious to see how this would compare to past concerts I have been to. I have a formal musical training and have been to many classical performances in the past several years. After seeing the Jupiter Quartet perform along with Chungliang Al Huang, I was amazed. I have a strong affinity for fusing juxtaposing forms of art, but I had never seen Eastern Tai Ji and Western classical music fuse so perfectly. My personal favorite was of Tchaikovsky accompanied by Al Huang. I personally love the work of Tchaikovsky, and his many works, but I had never seen this type of interpretation before. I was reminded of his Firebird Suite, an avant garde ballet. This time, however, I felt as though Tai Ji was bringing new life to previous paradigms of Western classical music. I found the various styles of dance, such as tango and ballet, to be incredibly interesting. The music, lights, and choreography meshed together seamlessly.

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