Tag Archives: Home

A Look Back at the Semester

By Luke Garza

Fist impressions matter. Going into FAA 110, I had no idea what to expect as a college freshman. Hearing that I would have to attend mandatory events was pretty shocking but after the first one, the events felt much less mandatory and I found myself looking forward to going to the KCPA every week.

Buddy Guy Merch Stand

We started off very strong with a performance from Buddy Guy. Buddy Guy’s performance was very personal and interactive, he took moments to joke and chat with the audience, he even walked through the seating area. Out of all the performances we saw, I’m glad this was the first. Buddy Guy gave us a taste of how unique all the performances we had in store for us truly were.

Chris Botti on stage

Chris Botti was a very interesting performance, he was loud and energetic his whole performance. You could really see how passionate he was about playing the trumpet. His concert incorporated a lot of motion on his part, while he played you could see him move his body in reaction to the notes he was hitting. For example, whenever he got louder he would lean back into it almost as if he was projecting himself more. On top of this, the other musicians really complemented his own playing.

Home before the play

Our first narrative style event was a play called Home. It was about a group of people all living in the same home, but they don’t know the others are living there. They each lead their own lives without ever noticing the others. The end of the play was where things really got wacky though. They started selecting audience members to join the stage cast, and I was one of those randomly selected. I didn’t expect to slow dance with a guy in a chicken suit of all things that night.

Outside the Krannert Art Museum

Jennifer Monson’s Dance Workshop was our first event not at the KCPA and also our first fully interactive event. We waled all around the Krannert Art Museum moving our bodies and analyzing artwork to better understand art and dance. Interpretation is much harder when you have to used your body to convey a message. It was a great chance of pace and it felt good to move around and interact with my peers outside of class time.

Gem of the Ocean’s Main Stage

Gem of the Ocean was a narrative play about one man’s quest to have his soul cleansed for his sins. It was very story driven, the characters had meaningful interactions and backstories, some were elaborated on or revealed later in to the play through meaningful parts. Their motives were very clear and their actors assumed the roles as if they were actually them. They played their characters so well it felt as if the audience also developed a relationship with them, me personally I came to dislike the sadistic character the most, for his actions against the main characters and the side characters.

The Illinois Wind Symphony in costume

The Illinois Wind Symphony was an event that I went to see on my own, I went with a friend because she had an extra ticket and I definitely enjoyed the experience. I think what most popped out was how the entire band was in costume for the first half for the Halloween spirit. Not only did they look incredible, but they sounded equally as amazing, and when they brought out the saxophone quartet, everything got exponentially better. I’d say this had to be one of my favorite events, it was all around a great experience and I would definitely want to go see them play again.

Just before the concert

Jazz at the Lincoln Center was a good follow up to the Wind Symphony, while there were no costumes, there was still great music. All the artists complemented each other very well, everyone felt as if the had a role to fill and they filled it so well. The highlights were definitely the solos performed by the individual musicians. They would stand up, shifting to being the center of attention while playing louder. Overall I think they had incredible synergy and excellent standalone parts.

Seats early before the play

The Nature of Forgetting was our final event, a play about a man with dementia reliving his life memories of his deceased wife. It really captures the erratic nature of memory as he jumps from memory to memory, seeming lost in his own mid. He darts from the classroom, to the street on his bike, to his wedding day, and eventually back to the present. You can see his distress in his character’s actions, the emphasis on memory through the mist and the light focusing on certain spots, they really do an excellent job setting the mood the entire time.

Overall, this semester was full of many incredible events, many of which I’d see again given the chance. I can’t recommend this class enough, from the events to the Professors, everthing was amazing.

Farewell to FAA 110

Written by Ashleigh Cox

The first photo I took at KCPA!

As ready as I am for the upcoming semester to begin, I’m going to be very sad to leave behind FAA 110. Anyone of my peers has heard me talk about this class at least eight times because I enjoyed it so much. Having a class that was more focused on making me think about the different parts that go into performance and had very little work to go with it was very good for my mental health and the first semester of my college career.

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The Complexities of a Home [Make-Up]

Written by Raymond Diaz

Home, by Geoff Sobelle, is a captivating performance partnered with illusion and intricate engineering that builds a house right before your eyes and shows the complexities of what it is like for people living like anyone else. Through this there was relatability and allowed the audience to experience the questions of what is home and when do we know it is a home?

https://krannertcenter.com/events/home-geoff-sobelle

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True Meaning of “Home”

Colwell Playhouse’s performance of Home captivates the audience through its portrayals of the fast-pace chaos that is human life.

Written by Danielle Herrera.

On Friday, Sept. 27 I walked into the Krannert Center of Performing Arts without any prior knowledge as to what I was about to witness. Having been the piano accompanist for a number of various musicals, I’m quite familiar with theater and performance. However, this was my first time attending a play, which completely lacks the song and dance involved in musicals; for this reason, I was concerned that the performance wouldn’t feel as lively. Little did I know, there are countless other aspects of plays that are just as captivating as those found in musical theater.  

The show opened up with a dim, completely empty stage. There was no movement nor light, which cause the room quiet down into deafening silence. Then, after a few moments a man entered on stage and began setting up lights, building what appeared to be a wall. His movements were purposeful and captivating, which in my opinion set the vibe for the entire show. 

As the play progressed, various rooms were built on stage right in front of the audience. This gave viewers an inside look on the long process of creating a home, while simultaneously demonstrating countless life events that would take place in anyone’s home. More and more characters were introduced, portraying their separate lives whilst physically using the same set. Finally, at the end, the characters all join together in a scene of celebration. 

I thought that the incorporation of the audience into the play made the performance more exciting and entertaining to watch. Seeing familiar faces being pulled on stage gave the show a new energy, and also allowed the audience to feel as though they are part of the performance. My favorite part was when Valleri, our professor, was invited on stage and asked to describe her home. Hearing her own genuine stories and descriptions of her childhood home reminded me of my own memories of my house. It made me realize how important it is for everyone to have their own place to call home. 

Home by Geoff Sobelle was a performance filled with so much chaos and laughter. It depicted scenes of life, death, sadness, and celebration using just one house setting, which revealed a universal thread amongst us humans: everyone needs a home. It doesn’t matter if it’s a house, or an apartment, or even just a room; people need a space to experience life. I loved watching this play, and I would definitely recommend it to anyone who’s looking to find new perspective on what makes a home, “home”.

For more info about this performance, go to https://krannertcenter.com/events/home-geoff-sobelle

Immersive “Home” Experience

Written by Nicole Miao

The story of “Home” began with two small lights, a wooden frame and two plastic sheets.

When a man in casual clothes came to the stage directly from the auditorium instead of the background, I thought he was a staff at first. When he assembled the materials into a wall and changed the scene into a small bed and a door, I realized that he was an actor. There were many different people in and out of the door, such as women, boys, and elderly. Not too long after that, several decorators appeared, converting the scene into a larger house and starting to carry furniture inside. I could gradually distinguish the kitchen, living room, bathroom, study and bedroom.

Until the last piece of furniture was moved in, the hostess walked into the house with flowers, and a complete “home” appeared. The new day began with a simulation of sunshine through the venetian blinds on the second floor window and realistic barking. From getting up and washing, dressing up, and carrying the packages out, the actors presented us with different lives of different roles. The elderly did housework, the child went to school and adults went to work. This reminded me of my own life. Before I entered the college, every day after I get up, my mother drove me school and then came back to do housework. My dad had to work every day, occasionally going on a business trip. People in a home methodically handled their own life.

The actors celebrated the graduation of “students”

The most amazing thing that shocked me was in the second part. Actors began to interact with the audience actively. The little boy stepped down and invited us to taste the olives (I tasted one, but it was sour). The other actors let the audience stand and put the string of lights on the top of the head. They also invited many audience, including several of my friends, to come to the stage and participate in the party and celebrate the birthday. I was still thinking about the logic of plot just before this part, such as what the meaning is when actors entered and exited from the door at the beginning. But when the audience cheered, I felt that the logic of the story was no longer so important. Now I am part of the story, and I am also completing this story about Home.

The audience and actors sang and danced together on the stage

I was immersed in the performance until the end. It turned out that interacting with the audience is the most direct way to get audience into the situation. I could not refuse this kind of interaction, which was a wonderful experience I have never had before.

Actor’s curtain call

If you want to learn more about Home by Geoff Sobelle, visit this website: https://krannertcenter.com/events/home-geoff-sobelle

Back home

Written by César Díaz Blanco

Geoff Sobelle’s dreamlike play took the Colwell Playhouse audience by surprise. Wood frames and staples started what would become home or a memory of it. The uncoherent scenes at the beginning sparked the curiosity of the viewers, necessary for the rest of the play. Then, the harmony of the life of the residents made us relate to them. Finally, the familiarity with the house made us dwellers.

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‘Home’ Away From Home

Written by Ashleigh Cox

In Colwell Playhouse at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Geoff Sobelle’s Home captivated the audience on Friday night. The play brought together theater, illusions, and some impressive engineering for the set that was used. The performance pressed the audience to consider the true meaning of a home as we watched the lives of several characters play out in one space.

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Home, Sweet Home

Best Show I’ve ever Watched

Written by Zhengqi Xu

Home became the best show I’ve ever watched last week. It was abusolutely amazing for me and, I believe, for everyone. Everything about the show including the actors, scenes, and plays.

Helping actors hang lights with other the other audience to decorate the theatre

At first, I was confused with the meaning of the story the show was trying to tell, so I was trying hard to understand every details the show displayed. At the same time, I was surprised by the tricks the actors were doing. They could just change themselves to another actor by hide themselves for a second, and that was the point I started getting interested in the show.

The band coming down to the floor and interacting with us

Later, I was getting into the story of the show. Home was telling a story about a home in which several people live. All these people seemed unrelated in the first place, but they were actually interrelated to each other. The interactions between each roles were really sweet and I felt a sense of warm inside the theatre.

Some of us getting invited to the stage and participate as part of the show

At last, we were hyped by the plot where they invited plenty of the audience to the stage and participate. There was a scene depicted a night when everyone inside the house invited all kinds of friends to have a large party. I must say I enjoyed the plot so much that I was smiling all the time towards the end.

In the end, all the audience stood up and applauded for all the actors who showed up. Home is not just a show for me, but a real sweet home that night.

Geoff Sobelle shows us the meaning of a Home

By Luke Garza

On September 27th, the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts showcased the play Home in the Colwell Playhouse. The play slowly evolved from the silent story of one man who had built a house, the the stories of several people, each living out their own lives in the same home, unaware of the other’s very existence. Towards the end, even the audience became a central role in the amazing play, both in on stage participation and in helping to set the mood for the scene.

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