Tag Archives: music

Edward Huang Final Reflection- Fall 2019

An overview of my experiences this semester

Written by Edward Huang

Buddy Guy Prepares to enter the stage

The first performance I went to was a performance by Buddy Guy and his band. I did not know of him before, but I definitely can’t forget his name now. He brought an energy that was fitting for his legacy in the jazz world. I was completely encaptivated with his ability to control the auditorium. Not to mention, his technical skills were amazing and he did a good job with having a conversation with the audience. In the end, his passion was what stuck out to me.

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Farewell to FAA 110

Written by Ashleigh Cox

The first photo I took at KCPA!

As ready as I am for the upcoming semester to begin, I’m going to be very sad to leave behind FAA 110. Anyone of my peers has heard me talk about this class at least eight times because I enjoyed it so much. Having a class that was more focused on making me think about the different parts that go into performance and had very little work to go with it was very good for my mental health and the first semester of my college career.

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A Sad Sayonara to FAA 110

I have seen so many great shows and museum exhibits this semester and I don’t want to say goodbye!

Written by Catherine Webber

At the beginning of this semester, I was at a bit of a crossroads. I had come back from summer knowing that I wanted to switch from Early Childhood Education to something else. I just knew that wasn’t what I wanted anymore. Therefore, I drastically dropped all my classes and switched to English, which I now love. However, with my change I had to pick up more hours and I just didn’t know what class to take. I went around asking friends and they all recommended one class to me: FAA 110. They said I would be able to see awesome shows for free on-campus and be exposed to so many new and different things, safe to say: I was sold. I have really enjoyed this class this semester and can’t wait to come back next semester and see more great and thought-provoking shows and exhibits.

1. Pat Metheny Rocked the House

2. Eric Andre Leaves Little to the Imagination

3. Drop Dead Gorgeous Drag Queens

4. Hearty House Show in Colorado

5. Chopin Showcase Does Not Disappoint

6. Still Beginning Challenges What We Think We Know

7. Jazz Drives Audience to Jive

8. TANGO at KAM

I had such a great time this semester in this class, and I know that if any of my friends come to me with class recommendations I will surely lead them to FAA 110! Thank you for a great semester!

The Nature of Forgetting

Written by Ashleigh Cox

Tom expresses his frustration!

The Nature of Forgetting is a powerful play about a man’s memory fading with Alzheimer’s and how it appears from his point of view. Theatre Re performed the piece at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts on November 12th and it was quite a memorable event!

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The Nature of Forgetting was unforgettable

Written by: Laura Chong

The best theater performance I have EVER seen! The Nature of Forgetting is edged into my memory forever.

The casts for “The Nature of Forgetting”

The play had me sitting on the edge of the seat, curious to watch till the end of the performance. It was spectacular how the story came across so beautifully despite the fact that the show had little talking.

The performance indicated memory through the use music and sound. They used jarring music that sounded like broken minds and the discovery of memories. The play then continued with a new memory after the jarring music.

Through the use of lighting, they focused the audience’s attention on a particular object/action. There was another scene when they were watching a home movie together and I really enjoyed that one too. Each time the lighting focuses on a new object, it signified a new memory. In this school scene, they focused the lighting on the tables and the actor and actresses.

Memory of school

Through the use of movement, they expressed their emotions so clearly. When Tom and Isabella got married, they danced. Their dance expressed happiness because they were dancing so fluidly and with such exaggerated big actions. Other than using dance, some movements were jagged, which made it seem like a transitioning memory.

Through the use of set pieces, they reflect different scenes. The most notable set pieces were the bicycle when Tom was riding with Isabella, the school tables and the changing room. They brought out the different scenes and memories really well. The use of costumes also helps to reflect different memories and scenes. This goes hand in hand with the use of set pieces. For example, when the clothing racks and chair was in the scene, together with “Isabella” dressed in teenager clothing, it represented the present, when Tom is trying to get dressed for his birthday. However, when “Isabella” is wearing a school uniform, wedding dress or the red dress, it represented a different memory.

Wynton Marsalis

By, Jessica Moreno

Program and Ticket

On November 1st at Krannert Center for Performing Arts, the Wynton Marsalis and his ensemble performed in Foellinger Great Hall and it was amazing. Wynton Marsalis has led this ensemble for over three decades. playing an amazing blend of masterworks by Ellington, Basie, Monk, Mingus, Goodman, and more with original compositions, Lincoln Center-commissioned works, and rare historic pieces. Marsalis ensemble is made of more than 15 of the jazz world’s finest soloists and ensemble players. And they are truly remarkable

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Wynton Marsalis at KCPA

Written by Ashleigh Cox

The orchestra just before intermission

The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra performed at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts and it was an absolute delight to see and hear! The performance featured individual performers as well as the entire ensemble and played a wonderful blend of fast-paced, energetic songs and slower pieces.

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Wynton Marsalis at Krannert Center

By Rachel Yao

Wynton Marsalis and his ensemble perform various jazz compositions at Foellinger Great Hall at KCPA on November 1st, 2019.

A photo of the ticket outside Foellinger Great Hall.
A view of the stage from my seat (taken before the performance began).

Walking in to the auditorium, I was amazed at the interior design and symmetry. And, because of the way the auditorium was built, the sounds from the jazz band were loud and crisp.

In each piece, there were solo showcases, including trumpet, clarinet, piano, saxophone, and more. When it was the soloist’s turn to play, the ensemble went from mezzo forte to mezzo piano and the soloist played loud and clear, while still blending in with the ensemble. The clarinet, trumpet, and saxophonist all played very high notes with complex rhythms and dynamics. In particular, I enjoyed the pianist’s solo that showcased very upbeat yet rhythmic tones. It really stood out to me, considering I played the piano since I was very young. I love the sound of the piano and I enjoyed hearing the pianist play fast, staccato melodies.

In comparison to Chris Botti, I felt that Botti’s playing was more loose and carefree in relation to Marsalis’. Both had various solos that used a wide range of dynamics, both very loud and quiet, while still allowing for the rest of the ensemble/band to be heard.

A photo I took of the stairs outside the auditorium on the way out.

Link for more information: https://krannertcenter.com/events/jazz-lincoln-center-orchestra-wynton-marsalis