Tag Archives: musical

Cabaret: A Challenge

Krannert’s presentation of Cabaret offered a deeply challenging and condemning performance of the dangers of apathy.

Stresemann, a man I knew as a champion of the Republic that would eventually fall to dictatorship…alongside other historical facts to remind us there was a world moving along outside the rise of fascism.
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Cabaret: A Glimpse At a Historical Turning Point

On March 7th, the world-famous musical Cabaret was performed at the Tryon Festival Theatre of the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts. The background of the story is Berlin from 1929 to 1930. It began with an American novelist traveling to Berlin seeking inspiration for his novel. By depicting the fate of the characters at that very moment of history, it told a story that is touching and thought-provoking, and a tale that depicts fantasy and reality.

Written by Yushan Guo

The curtain right before the musical began
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Willkommen, Bienvenue, Welcome to the Cabaret

The Cabaret has a field of complex characters in the conflicting period before World War II in Germany. Although the songs are sometimes fun and exciting, the story is much more dramatic and the actors, students of the University of Illinois, do an excellent job of conveying the layered emotions of their characters.

The actors and musicians at the end of the performance.

Written by Grace Chen

When we first walked into the theatre, the orchestra was already playing music that fit the era. It established the mood of the musical early on and it told me that I was going to be transported to the early 1900s in this musical. The light jazz that blended into the start of the show mimicked how an actual audience member of the Kit Kat Klub probably felt and the Welcome song served as an introduction to the role of the Klub to the story.

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Historical Commentary as Theatre: Cabaret

The world renowned musical Cabaret was performed at the Tryon Festival Theatre in the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts on February 27, 2020 at 7:30pm. The production was in sponsorship with the School of Music, the Lyric Theatre, the Illinois Theatre, and Dance at Illinois. 

By Elena Grantcharski 

Program for the Cabaret Production

The musical took place in 1930s Germany. The music was a testament to this time period because of the cabaret style jazz music. The music was played by a live jazz band on stage. It reminds me of the jazz bands that were prevalent during the Roaring Twenties. This time period in general was the beginning stage of jazz as a music genre in general. In terms of the characters, the music was usually a form of dialogue for each of the characters. For example, every solo piece Sally Bowles sang expressed her desires, emotions, and plan of action at the moment. Her first piece showed us her life at the club and how she ended up having the career she does.

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Crazy for a Break

“Crazy for you” was a show that never slowed down as soon as it began, and not in a great way.

By: Daniel Corry

A picture I snapped right when the first group was coming out for applause at the end. The set design was spectacular!

I have to be honest, “Crazy for you” was a bit of a disappointing show in my opinion. The story just seemed really dated, sexist, and quickly written. For starters, the “woman needing a man to rescue her” trope was painfully obvious here with the female lead singing the song titled, “Someone to watch over me”, which received a painful eye roll.

The story also just moved along at a crazy pace! First Polly does not need a man, then she falls in love with literally the first one who talks to her within an hour, then she gets mad at him and leaves him without even listening to him. The “villain” of this story only hates the main character because…they like the same woman? And then after awhile just kind of forgets that he loves her at all? And the “Ziegler” character, who hated our main character, and then is completely cool with that same character impersonating him in a small town for weeks, and then offers to completely fund the towns show on his own? The whole story just seemed very rushed and inconsistent.

And sadly, it wasn’t just the story that seemed underdone. The production seemed off as well. There were characters with speaking parts who simply weren’t mic’d up, the tap dancing sections sounded muffled, some of the actors would get so focused on dancing they would completely forget to smile and look in pain on stage, it was honestly a shame to see!

It wasn’t all bad however, the female lead truly did have a great voice and it was fun to watch her shine onstage. Similarly, there was one side character, “Moose” who really acted very well and put a lot of character into his role. You really heard the audience come to life whenever he was on the stage. And the pit orchestra really did outstanding as well.

While sadly, this was probably one of the highest budget shows I saw for this class, it also seemed one of the least produced, and I suppose it just goes to show that money does not specifically mean a show will do well.

La Bohème —-Beauty of Love

Written By Tim Gao

Photo By Tim Gao

Thursday night at Krannert Art center, it was crowded. People are waiting for admission to the opera, La Bohème. La Bohème features young love, fragileness of life, and friendship. The usage of color and background music are all creative and attractive.

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Comedy at the Krannert Center

A hilarious musical comedy at the Krannert Center

Written by Bill Xun

Taken by Bill Xun

This week the class went to see A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum in the Colwell Playhouse at the Krannert Center. I had an absolute blast watching this musical comedy. Everything came together perfectly — the set, the actors, and the music .It was two hours of nonstop comedy, and I enjoyed watching every second of it.

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