Tag Archives: play

True Meaning of “Home”

Colwell Playhouse’s performance of Home captivates the audience through its portrayals of the fast-pace chaos that is human life.

Written by Danielle Herrera.

On Friday, Sept. 27 I walked into the Krannert Center of Performing Arts without any prior knowledge as to what I was about to witness. Having been the piano accompanist for a number of various musicals, I’m quite familiar with theater and performance. However, this was my first time attending a play, which completely lacks the song and dance involved in musicals; for this reason, I was concerned that the performance wouldn’t feel as lively. Little did I know, there are countless other aspects of plays that are just as captivating as those found in musical theater.  

The show opened up with a dim, completely empty stage. There was no movement nor light, which cause the room quiet down into deafening silence. Then, after a few moments a man entered on stage and began setting up lights, building what appeared to be a wall. His movements were purposeful and captivating, which in my opinion set the vibe for the entire show. 

As the play progressed, various rooms were built on stage right in front of the audience. This gave viewers an inside look on the long process of creating a home, while simultaneously demonstrating countless life events that would take place in anyone’s home. More and more characters were introduced, portraying their separate lives whilst physically using the same set. Finally, at the end, the characters all join together in a scene of celebration. 

I thought that the incorporation of the audience into the play made the performance more exciting and entertaining to watch. Seeing familiar faces being pulled on stage gave the show a new energy, and also allowed the audience to feel as though they are part of the performance. My favorite part was when Valleri, our professor, was invited on stage and asked to describe her home. Hearing her own genuine stories and descriptions of her childhood home reminded me of my own memories of my house. It made me realize how important it is for everyone to have their own place to call home. 

Home by Geoff Sobelle was a performance filled with so much chaos and laughter. It depicted scenes of life, death, sadness, and celebration using just one house setting, which revealed a universal thread amongst us humans: everyone needs a home. It doesn’t matter if it’s a house, or an apartment, or even just a room; people need a space to experience life. I loved watching this play, and I would definitely recommend it to anyone who’s looking to find new perspective on what makes a home, “home”.

For more info about this performance, go to https://krannertcenter.com/events/home-geoff-sobelle

‘Home’ Away From Home

Written by Ashleigh Cox

In Colwell Playhouse at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Geoff Sobelle’s Home captivated the audience on Friday night. The play brought together theater, illusions, and some impressive engineering for the set that was used. The performance pressed the audience to consider the true meaning of a home as we watched the lives of several characters play out in one space.

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Geoff Sobelle shows us the meaning of a Home

By Luke Garza

On September 27th, the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts showcased the play Home in the Colwell Playhouse. The play slowly evolved from the silent story of one man who had built a house, the the stories of several people, each living out their own lives in the same home, unaware of the other’s very existence. Towards the end, even the audience became a central role in the amazing play, both in on stage participation and in helping to set the mood for the scene.

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A New Way to Look at Home

Geoff Sobelle brings his interpretation of home for the people of Champaign-Urbana

The lights and energy of “Home” fill up Colwell Playhouse at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts

Written by Edward Huang

On a chilly Friday evening, guests gathered at Colwell Playhouse in Krannert Center for the Performing arts, eager to see what “Home” by Geoff Sobelle had in store for them. The stage was set with a display of mystery. There were bright lights glaring at the audience, preventing them from seeing anything in the dark backstage. I felt that this built up the interest of the crowd. When an actor from the audience walked onto the stage, the crowd waited in silence, all with piqued curiosity for what was to come.

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Home by Geoff Sobelle

By Rachel Yao

Geoff Sobelle’s “Home” showcases a mix of music and theatre while building a house from scratch at Colwell Playhouse in KCPA on September 27th, 2019.

A mix of actors and audience members on stage in the house built during the play.

“Home” starts off with a man wondering around on stage, picking up lanterns, and building a small wall out of wood and plastic sheets. As the play goes on, more characters start appearing, including the construction workers who quickly built a house in front of our very eyes. There was a bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, dining room, living room, and office within the house. Room decor, like pictures and vases, and furniture, like couches and desks, decorated the home while the residents unpacked. The stage quickly transformed into a warm home with ambient noises, wind blowing, leaves ruffling, and dog barking, mixed with realistic lighting that portrayed day and night.

Beginning of the play, where the man builds a wall made of wood and plastic sheets.

As the story unfolds, we see the daily life of each resident, from waking up to doing chores to arguing with each other. Seeing each resident live their own lives made me think and reflect on my own experiences at home. The play made me think about my morning routine and hectic schedules that I follow on a daily basis back at home and in my dorm at university. At the end of the play, the residents one by one began packing their belongings and moving out. This act made me think about the time I was moving from Minnesota to California, and then moving to university in Illinois. As a result, I could sympathize with the actors as they portrayed their lives.

Actors and audience members performing a scene where the residents were packing up to move out.

To my surprise, the actors also interacted with the audience throughout the play, whether it was offering food and drinks, asking for people to stand and hold strings of lights, singing happy birthday, or bringing them on stage to be part of the act. It made the audience feel cheerful, as if they were also a part of or invited to the party. I thought this strengthened the connection between the audience and the actors to create a lasting impression and to sympathize with them by drawing more of the audience’s attention to the scene.

Audience members standing to hold up strings of lights to be hung from the balcony.
Actors and audience members in a scene after a party where they mourn over a death.

More info on “Home” by Geoff Sobelle: https://krannertcenter.com/events/home-geoff-sobelle

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

This was my favorite show so far. I used to build sets for plays in high school so I always think it is interesting to see how directors make the set and how they interpret it. I thought the set for this show and how the cast interacted with it was so cool, one of my favorite sets I have ever seen. I like to pay attention to how the lighting is put into the play too and I really liked how it was.

I am also a very emotional person and I was so emotional during this play. the actors were so good I felt so into the play and into the story, I loved it. All of the actors played their characters so well I was so impressed. I am a person with a very short attention span, I do not even enjoy sitting through movies in movie theaters, but this play kept me engaged and interested. The actors played their roles so well.

I think an actor playing someone who is disabled but is not disabled is something that is very controversial right now. The actor has to play this role very well and be educated about the role they are performing. After discussing it in class I learned they did their research to make this role happen and that makes me very happy.

Vindicating Iconic Women

by Alia Muhammad Radzi

Booklet to Because I am your Queen

Stories usually have beginnings and endings; and the perspectives of those stories are called narratives. It’s often easier to swallow what is given then question, which is perhaps why, we accept stories of the past with powerful female protagonist, written by male authors, ending in somewhat a tragedy. Therefore, I appreciate what Because I am Your Queen is trying to present to the audience, especially in this time where there is a rise in female representation and reshaping narratives.

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Paralleling Mind and Reality

By Alia Muhammad Radzi

A play entitled The Curious Incident of The Dog In the Night-time

On Thursday night, the class was given the opportunity to be audience to the first play in the syllabus. What a delightfully engaging play it was, and directed by our very own professor, Dr. Latrelle Bright. Due to the hectic day I had earlier in the day, I was sure that I would end up being asleep for part of the play due to exhaustion. On the contrary, I was so engaged during the performance, where I smiled, laughed, worried and cried with the audience.

Tickets to the Play
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