Monthly Archives: November 2019

Illinois Modern Ensemble – Sound of the War

Written by Zhengqi Xu

Illinois Modern Ensemble is a show that I only had little understanding of, and I was trying my best to learn the meaning of it.

Big crowd of people coming for the show

The show consisted of 5 parts which featured different style of playing and some local singers. The whole melody of the first part was the frightening to be honest. I don’t know if I am the only peoson who thought in that way, but I really felt uncomfortable sitting there listening them playing music which was so scary.

List of the 5 parts

However, I started to understand a little bit of what the show was about during the second part of the show. The second part was called Philosykos and it tells the story of the war. Basically, the story was about how war is cruel and thousands of corpses lie. So, I thought maybe the show was trying to be scarstic about how war play a role in people’s history.

People clapping when the show ended

The rest parts of the show was much the same of the first two parts. The music was frightening and made me feel nervous the whole time. But, this show was another one that I had never seen before, and I highly appreciate this opportunity.

Nature of Forgetting

Jake Xiao

Stage

The Natural of Forgetting, a show currently in the UK and around the world, is performed in Krannert center. The Natural of Forgetting talks about the story of Tom, a father who is struggling in the early stages of dementia with many early life memories, such as schools, graduation, weddings, daughter’s birth.

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[MAKEUP EVENT] Unforgettable CSO symphony concert

Written by Nicole Miao

At the beginning of this semester, I flipped through the calendar of events and found the scheduled performance of Chicago Symphony Orchestra on campus. I am afraid that it would be hard to get a ticket when it is accessible, and because I have never been an usher at the performance before, I signed up as an usher for this performance.

Selecting my section
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Forgetting

By Jessica. Moreno

Program and ticket

On November 12, at the Krannert Center for the performing arts Theatre RE performed “The Nature Of Forgetting”. Which was an amazing performance about a middle-aged father who is struggling in the early stages of dementia. It talks about his memories and what he is forgetting.

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An exploration of the African Diaspora-makeup assignment

Written by Bria Thurman

African culture does not only exist within the continent of Africa’s border but across the world.
This was my favorite

On October 24th I went to the Krannert Art Museum and listened to an art talk about the African diaspora. Allyson Purpura is the curator of the exhibit and we explored the use of language and religion as artistry. She first explained what the African diaspora was and how we exist in almost all continents more specifically those involved with the slave trade. This was an interesting seminar of sorts to be able to sit in on.

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Forgetting: the Inevitable Downfall

Written by Danielle Herrera

Theatre Re’s performance “The Nature of Forgetting” gives a shockingly emotional portrayal of the struggles that emerge from gradual memory deterioration.

Colwell Playhouse at Krannert Center of Performing Arts

On Tuesday I walked into the Colwell Playhouse of the Krannert Center about 5 minutes late into the performance, having absolutely no idea what was going on onstage. I remember witnessing seemingly random scenes being acted out with no sense of an actual plot line or story; everything appeared to be nonsense that lacked any type of correlation. However, as the performance progressed the random scenes were repeated over and over again but with more context. This enabled the audience to piece together exactly what was happening, which was the memory deterioration of a man who was suffering from dementia.

Theatre Re, https://baylinartists.com/theatre-re/

The aspect of this performance in which I was most impressed with was the techniques that were used to indicate memories versus the present. On the stage there was an elevated platform that was used to illustrate scenes that were happening in the past, while everything outside of the platform represented present events. So for instance, flashbacks of the man when he was a student in grade school were portrayed on the elevated surface, whereas the scene with the man and his daughter getting ready for his birthday was acted out on stage. What I thought was very interesting, however, was how the actors also used the raised platform to depict the loss of the man’s memories. There were several moments where either objects or people are pulled off the platform and the man visibly tries to keep them from falling off; this demonstrates how the man is actively trying to salvage what he has left of his memories.

Another way in which the play depicted transitions between present day versus past moments were through lighting and music. Flashbacks tended to be bright with much more playful music, whereas scenes that occured during present day were slightly dimmer and completely silent. The use of lighting and music helped emphasize the nostalgia and bliss that accompany happy memories of the past.

Leading Cast member at the end of the show

Overall, I was captivated for the entirety of the show and I could honestly say this has been one of my favorite plays that I have attended. The depiction of happy, carefree memories could easily be related to by the majority of audience; for this reason, visually seeing the slow deterioration of these recollections were especially emotion-evoking. The performance itself was extremely intricate yet fairly easy to follow, and I would definitely recommend this play to anyone who has the opportunity to watch it.

For more information, go to https://krannertcenter.com/events/theatre-re-nature-forgetting.

Punishment of Individuality [Make-Up]

Written by Raymond Diaz

The Dawn of the Individual: Laocoon’s Punishment

The marble statue of Laocoon’s Punishment

A Trojan Priest who sensed that the Trojan’s gift, the wooden horse, was something to be wary of. Voicing his concern to the people he pleaded with the people to listen to his doubts and not accept the gift, however, the Greek god Poseidon, who favored the Greeks, would not allow for this to occur and sent serpents to kill Laocoon and his sons. Seeing as the gods punished him, the Trojans preceded to then bring the gift in and ultimately led to the demise of the Trojans. The story is said to illustrate the voice of the individual who challenges the consensus, even so far as to oppose the gods.

The statue was made by creating a plaster cast marble copy of the Roman marble copy located in the Vatican Museum, which is a copy of the hellenistic bronze original that has been lost for many years. However, the various chizzlings and details used to express the movements in the figures is impressive, twisting the bodies into various poses to show the muscle movements of their struggle dealing with the serpents tangling around them. Their carved out expressions showing shock and fear as to what is happening because of their beliefs. The reason for marble being that many of the Roman sculptors used this form and the Vatican housing one of them to show a piece of history and try to bring you into that time.

It was brought here through plaster copy in order to bring a piece of history to the museum to help show the Roman era in time accompanied by the various other relics in the exhibit. The interactions shown with it have brought intrigue and curiosity as we see the results of one going against a god, but also examining it to bring it into our current time, seeing how individuality today can bring great ramifications, but also being encouraged to be an individual and form your own way in life.

The Complexities of a Home [Make-Up]

Written by Raymond Diaz

Home, by Geoff Sobelle, is a captivating performance partnered with illusion and intricate engineering that builds a house right before your eyes and shows the complexities of what it is like for people living like anyone else. Through this there was relatability and allowed the audience to experience the questions of what is home and when do we know it is a home?

https://krannertcenter.com/events/home-geoff-sobelle

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